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Rehabilitation

  • Julie K. Ries
  • Brian Potter
  • Antolin M. Llorente
Part of the Issues of Diversity in Clinical Neuropsychology book series (ISSUESDIV)

It should be patently clear that the historical record provided in most rehabilitation textbooks is Eurocentric in its perspective. For example, although Eurocentric history tends to note the emergence of trephination in Egypt, it fails to note that in the “New World,” the advanced Chinchoros culture of Northern Chile, precursors to the complex, eminent, and sophisticated Inca State, perfected artificial mummification as a means to protect the body and soul in the afterlife. However, unbeknownst to large number of students in the field of neuropsychology, psychology, and rehabilitation, is the fact that the Chinchoros perfected this process in the third millennium BC, most likely before or temporally concurrent with the Egyptians (Mosely, 1993). This example is provided because it underscores the importance of attending to our cultural biases, even when addressing a discipline’s history, an issue that should be taken into consideration when rehabilitating individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds, including Hispanics.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Acquire Brain Injury American Immigration Primary Nephrotic Syndrome Symptom Validation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie K. Ries
    • 1
  • Brian Potter
    • 2
  • Antolin M. Llorente
    • 3
  1. 1.Mount Washington Pediatric HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Texas Children's HospitalHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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