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The Medicalization of Execution: Lethal Injection in the United States

  • Mark Heath

This paper aims to provide a “nuts and bolts” explanation and depiction of the medical and scientific mechanics of lethal injection. Most of the source information derives from material produced during litigation in which the author served, or is serving, as an expert witness for plaintiffs who are litigating in civil court to remedy perceived deficiencies in the lethal injection procedures employed by various state departments of corrections. Of note, the author has in the past and will in the future receive compensation for many, but not all, of these legal cases. Further, it is important to recognize that some of the data and documentation that has been reviewed by the author and that contributes to the author’s opinions has been placed under seal by court orders. Lastly, the author believes in the importance of disclosing that, as a result of his involvement in the legal challenges to lethal injection, he has developed a strong opposition to the imposition of the death penalty as it is presently administered in the United States.

Keywords

Potassium Chloride Medical Examiner Neuromuscular Blocking Agent Correction Official Royal Commission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Heath
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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