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Treatment and Reentry Approaches for Offenders with Co-occurring Disorders

  • Roger H. Peters
  • Nicole M. Bekman

A number of factors explain the influx of inmates with co-occurring disorders to jails and prisons. These include the closing and “downsizing” of state mental hospitals, adoption of restrictive civil commitment criteria, inadequate access to community support services, widespread availability of relatively cheap and rapidly addicting street drugs, and law enforcement efforts to eliminate drug use and drug-related street crime. Studies examining persons with mental disorders in community settings indicate that having co-occurring disorders increases the risk for community violence and for arrest (Monahan et al., 2001, 2005). Once arrested, persons with co-occurring disorders are more likely to be incarcerated, and once incarcerated, these persons remain in jail significantly longer than other inmates, and are more likely to receive a sentence that involves a period of custody (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2006; Peters, Sherman, & Osher, in press). This chapter explores emerging and innovative approaches for treatment and reentry of offenders who have co-occurring disorders in jails, prisons, and diversion settings. Key areas highlighted in this chapter include evidence-based models of treatment, program features and principles, reentry approaches, and program outcomes. Several challenges to correctional program implementation and funding are also explored, and implications are discussed for policy development and future research.

Keywords

Substance Abuse Treatment Assertive Community Treatment Drug Court Supplemental Security Income Substance Abuse Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger H. Peters
    • 1
  • Nicole M. Bekman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mental Health Law and Policy, Louis de la ParteUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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