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Otoacoustic Emissions in Amphibians, Lepidosaurs, and Archosaurs

  • Geoffrey A. Manley
  • Pim van Dijk
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 30)

Keywords

Hair Cell Tuning Curve Otoacoustic Emission Tectorial Membrane Basilar Papilla 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Geoffrey A. Manley
  • Pim van Dijk

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