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Drug Courts pp 377-388 | Cite as

Relapse

  • Timothy J. Kelly
  • James M. Gaither
  • Lucy J. King

Abstract

Substance dependence, like diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and many other diseases, is a remittent illness (1). When a patient with diabetes, for example, is found to have very low or very high blood sugar, adjustments in medication, diet, and daily activities are made in the treatment plan in order to minimize long-term complications. Unfortunately, because of the stigma involved, an individual who has been abstinent but has relapsed to abusing drugs and alcohol is more likely to receive a lecture rather than a treatment plan. This chapter addresses factors leading to relapse and appropriate ways of preventing and dealing with relapse.

Keywords

Nucleus Accumbens Sexual Offender Substance Abuse Treatment Relapse Prevention Substance Dependence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy J. Kelly
    • 1
  • James M. Gaither
    • 1
  • Lucy J. King
    • 2
  1. 1.Fairbanks HospitalIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Indiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

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