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Drug Courts pp 255-262 | Cite as

Analysis of Drug Testing Results

  • Olga A. Katz
  • Nikita B. Katz
  • Steven Mandel
  • James E. Lessenger

Abstract

All scientific assays are potentially prone to errors, especially false-negative and false-positive results, which necessitates careful analysis of results. This chapter is a basic guide for the interpretation of the results of drug tests in the setting of a drug court.

Keywords

Drug Court Benzalkonium Chloride Poppy Seed Breast Cyst Lysergic Acid Diethylamide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olga A. Katz
    • 1
  • Nikita B. Katz
    • 2
  • Steven Mandel
    • 1
  • James E. Lessenger
    • 3
  1. 1.Jefferson Medical College, Neurology and Neurophysiology Associates, PCPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.INR/Biomed, Inc.ConcordUSA
  3. 3.Solano County, BeniciaUSA

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