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Drug Courts pp 166-182 | Cite as

Counseling Strategies

  • Kathy R. Lay
  • Lucy J. King

Abstract

The essence of any counseling, regardless of the theoretical approach, is a series of conversations with an empathic counselor who assists a client in developing alternative perceptions of interpersonal interactions in the social environment. These insights provide the client with a new perspective for viewing people and situations and are used to develop alternative behaviors that are more productive and rewarding than previous inadequate or inappropriate coping strategies.

Keywords

Family Therapy Harm Reduction Substance Abuse Treatment Drug Court Alcoholic Anonymous 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathy R. Lay
    • 1
  • Lucy J. King
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Social WorkIndiana UniversityIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Indiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

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