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Scientific and applications programs

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

Manned spaceflight has always been the most dramatic, visible part of the space program. Unmanned programs, though less glamorous, have often brought greater benefits to ordinary citizens, be that through communications, weather forecasting or navigation. During the heyday of the Soviet space program, the Russians ran a broad range of unmanned programs, ranging from communications to weather satellites, missions with monkeys to materials-processing, Earth observations to space science. With the financial contraction of the 1990s, these programs were inevitably reduced in scale. Here we look at how Russia managed to adapt these programs to a very different financial environment. We start with the original Soviet applications program: communications satellites.

Keywords

European Space Agency Solar Panel Communication Satellite Small Satellite Space Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Praxis Publishing Ltd 2007

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