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Spices, Seasonings, and Flavors

  • Peter M. Brown

A Brief History

An entire text could be devoted to the history of spices. When caveman placed the first piece of meat over fire, the concept of flavor was created.

In ancient times, spices were status symbols in Europe and throughout the Mediterranean for the wealthy who ate them (Uhl, 2000). Spices had enormous trade value, not only as flavoring for food, but as medicines, preservatives, and perfumes (Uhl, 2000). As global travel developed, the spice trade expanded, resulting in the exchange and demand for spices not common to particular populations. India, Asia, and China introduced anise, basil, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, garlic, ginger, mace, mustard, nutmeg, onion, tamarind, and turmeric. The Middle East and Mediterranean countries exposed bay leaf, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel, fenugreek, rosemary, sage, sesame, and thyme. North America and the Latin American countries provided allspice, annatto, chile peppers, chocolate, and sassafras.

Based on archaeological excavations,...

Keywords

Meat Product Black Pepper Functional Ingredient Monosodium Glutamate Flavor Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Technical Services, A.C. Legg Inc.AlabamaUSA

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