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Plant Proteins

  • William Russell Egbert
  • C. Tony Payne

Introduction

Plant proteins are used to replace the functional and nutritional properties of skeletal muscle proteins in a variety of processed meat products. Throughout the world the most common plant proteins found in meat products are those derived from soybeans or wheat. There are a variety of other plant proteins that are or could be commercially available in the future including pea, potato, corn, canola, rice and various other proteins from legumes and oilseed sources. Worldwide, soy proteins are widely used in the meat industry for their emulsification, gelation, textural/structural, water binding, and nutritional properties. Wheat proteins are also frequently used in processed meat applications; functional properties of wheat proteins include structural, emulsification and water binding. Pea proteins are popular in Europe because they are currently produced from nongenetically modified organisms (non-GMO). Potato proteins are relatively new to the food processing industry and...

Keywords

Meat Product Plant Protein Wheat Gluten Water Binding Meat System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Russell Egbert
    • 1
  • C. Tony Payne
    • 2
  1. 1.Global Meat ApplicationsArcher Daniels Midland CompanyDecaturUSA
  2. 2.Protein Applications ResearchArcher Daniels Midland CompanyDecaturUSA

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