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Introduction

Meat formulas differ over time and across regions, the most predominant reason being economic conditions. Processors strive to provide products that are affordable by the majority of the population, replacing meat proteins with less expensive non-meat ingredients. Raw material availability can also be a reason for varying formulations. Animal fat, for example, is less available in some countries, requiring formulators to make adjustments for the lack of fat. Fat replacement in other countries is based on consumer trends for taste and texture of traditional products, but with a lower fat content. Food safety concerns have also caused processors to reformulate products to withstand treatments that promote a safer food product. Postpackaging pasteurization can cause a high degree of moisture loss, requiring the addition of an ingredient that aids in the retention of moisture. Organic acids are being used as an added hurdle for food safety. When adding the sodium salts of...

Keywords

Meat Product Sodium Alginate Konjac Flour Meat Application Kappa Carrageenan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Lamkey
    • 1
  1. 1.Symrise Inc.New JerseyUSA

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