Advertisement

Envelope Processing and Sound-Source Perception

  • Stanley Sheft
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 29)

Keywords

Stream Segregation Auditory Grouping Comodulation Masking Release Informational Masking Envelope Fluctuation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Apoux F, Bacon SP (2004) Relative importance of temporal information in various frequency regions for consonant identification in quiet and in noise. J Acoust Soc Am 116:1671–1680.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Arai T, Greenberg S (1998) Speech intelligibility in the presence of cross-channel spectral asynchrony. In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics Speech Signal Process (ICASSP) 2:933–936.Google Scholar
  3. Arai T, Pavel M, Hermansky H, Avendano C (1999) Syllable intelligibility for temporally filtered LPC cepstral trajectories. J Acoust Soc Am 105:2783–2791.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Atlas L (2003) Modulation spectral transforms—Applications to speech separation and modification. Technical Report, IEICE, Speech Dynamics by Ear, Eye, Mouth and Machine: An Interdisciplinary Workshop, Kyoto, Japan.Google Scholar
  5. Atlas L, Janssen C (2005) Coherent modulation spectral filtering for single-channel music source separation. In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference Acoustics Speech Signal Process (ICASSP) 4:461–464.Google Scholar
  6. Atlas L, Li Q, Thompson J (2004) Homomorphic modulation spectra. In: Proceeding of the IEEE International Conference Acoustics Speech Signal Process (ICASSP) 2:761–764.Google Scholar
  7. Attias H, Schreiner CE (1997) Temporal low-order statistics of natural sounds. In: Mozer MC, Jordan MI, Petsche T (eds) Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 27–33.Google Scholar
  8. Avendano C, Hermansky H (1997) On the properties of temporal processing for speech in adverse environments. In: Proceedings of WASPA’97,Mohonk, October 19–22, NY.Google Scholar
  9. Bacon SP, Grantham DW (1989) Modulation masking: Effects of modulation frequency, depth, and phase. J Acoust Soc Am 85:2575–2580.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Bacon SP, Konrad DL (1993) Modulation detection interference under conditions favoring within- or across-channel processing. J Acoust Soc Am 93:1012–1022.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Bacon SP, Viemeister NF (1985) Temporal modulation transfer functions in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. Audiology 24:117–134.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Bacon SP, Grimault N, Lee J (2002) Spectral integration in bands of modulated or unmodulated noise. J Acoust Soc Am 112:219–226.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Bacon SP, Moore BCJ, Shailer MJ, Jorasz U (1995) Effects of combining maskers in modulation detection interference. J Acoust Soc Am 97:1847–1853.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Bacon SP, Lee J, Peterson DN, Rainey D (1997) Masking by modulated and unmodulated noise: Effects of bandwidth, modulation rate, signal frequency, and masker level. J Acoust Soc Am 101:1600–1610.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Barbour DL, Wang X (2002) Temporal coherence sensitivity in auditory cortex. J Neurophysiol 88:2684–2699.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Baskent D, Shannon RV (2004) Frequency-place compression and expansion in cochlear implant listeners. J Acoust Soc Am 116:3130–3140.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Beauvois MW, Meddis R (1996) Computer simulation of auditory stream segregation in alternating-tone sequences. J Acoust Soc Am 99:2270–2280.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Berg BG (1996) On the relation between comodulation masking release and temporal modulation transfer functions. J Acoust Soc Am 100:1013–1023.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Biebel UW, Langner G (2002) Evidence for interactions across frequency channels in the inferior colliculus of awake chinchilla. Hear Res 169:151–168.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Borrill SJ, Moore BCJ (2002) Evidence that comodulation detection interferences depend on within-channel mechanisms. J Acoust Soc Am 111:309–319.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Bregman AS (1990) Auditory Scene Analysis. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  22. Bregman AS, Pinker S (1978) Auditory streaming and the building of timbre. Can J Psychol 32:19–31.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Bregman AS, Abramson J, Doehring P, Darwin CJ (1985) Spectral integration based on common amplitude modulation. Percept Psychophys 37:483–493.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Bregman AS, Levitan R, Liao C (1990) Fusion of auditory components: Effects of the frequency of amplitude modulation. Percept Psychophys 47:68–73.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Brown GJ, Wang DL (2000) An oscillatory correlation framework for computational auditory scene analysis. In: Solla SA, Leen TK, Müller KR (eds) Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 747–753.Google Scholar
  26. Bruckert L, Hermann M, Lorenzi C (2006) No adaptation in the amplitude modulation domain in trained listeners. J Acoust Soc Am 119:3542–3545.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Brungart DS, Iyer N, Simpson BD (2006) Monaural speech segregation using synthetic speech signals. J Acoust Soc Am 119:2327–2333.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Brunstrom JM, Roberts B (2001) Effects of asynchrony and ear of presentation on the pitch of mistuned partials in harmonic and frequency-shifted complex tones. J Acoust Soc Am 110:391–401.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  29. Buss E, Richards VM (1996) The effects on comodulation masking release of systematic variations in on- and off- frequency masker modulation patterns. J Acoust Soc Am 99:3109–3118.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  30. Buss E, Hall JW, Grose JH (2003) Effect of amplitude modulation coherence for masked speech signals filtered into narrow bands. J Acoust Soc Am 113:462–467.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Buss E, Hall JW, Grose JH (2004) Spectral integration of synchronous and asynchronous cues to consonant identification. J Acoust Soc Am 115:2278–2285.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  32. Buus S (1985) Release from masking caused by envelope fluctuations. J. Acoust Soc Am 78:1958–1965.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Buus S, Zhang L, Florentine M (1996) Stimulus-driven, time-varying weights for comodulation masking release. J Acoust Soc Am 99:2288–2297.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Carlyon RP (1994) Detecting mistuning in the presence of synchronous and asynchronous interfering sounds. J Acoust Soc Am 95:2622–2630.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Carlyon RP, Shamna S (2003) An account of monaural phase sensitivity. J Acoust Soc Am 114:333–348.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  36. Carlyon RP, Buus S, Florentine M (1989) Comodulation masking release for three types of modulator as a function of modulation rate. Hear Res 42:37–46.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  37. Carrell TD, Opie JM (1992) The effect of amplitude comodulation on auditory object formation in sentence perception. Percept Psychophys 52:437–445.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Christiansen TU, Dau T, Greenberg S (2006) Spectro-temporal processing of speech—an information-theoretic framework. International Symposium on Hearing, Cloppenburg, August 18–23, Germany.Google Scholar
  39. Ciocca V, Darwin CJ (1993) Effects of onset asynchrony on pitch perception: Adaptation of grouping? J Acoust Soc Am 93:2870–2878.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Cohen MF, Schubert ED (1987) The effect of cross-spectrum correlation on the detectability of a noise band. J Acoust Soc Am 81:721–723.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  41. Cusack R, Deeks J, Aikman G, Carlyon RP (2004) Effects of location, frequency region, and time course of selective attention on auditory scene analysis. J Exp Psychol [Hum Percept Perform] 30:643–656.Google Scholar
  42. Dai H, Green DM (1991) Effect of amplitude modulation on profile detection. J Acoust Soc Am 90:836–845.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Dannenbring GL, Bregman AS (1976) Stream segregation and the illusion of overlap. J Exp Psychol [Hum Percept Perform] 2:544–555.Google Scholar
  44. Dannenbring GL, Bregman AS (1978) Streaming vs. fusion of sinusoidal components of complex tones. Percept Psychophys 24:369–376.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  45. Darwin CJ (1981) Perceptual grouping of speech components differing in fundamental frequency and onset-time. Q J Exp Psychol 33A:185–207.Google Scholar
  46. Darwin CJ (1992) Listening to two things at once. In: Schouten MEH (ed) The Auditory Processing of Speech. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 133–147.Google Scholar
  47. Darwin CJ, Carlyon RP (1995) Auditory grouping. In: Moore BCJ (ed) Hearing. San Diego: Academic Press, pp. 387–424.Google Scholar
  48. Darwin CJ, Ciocca V (1992) Grouping in pitch perception: Effects of onset asynchrony and ear of presentation of a mistuned component. J Acoust Soc Am 91:3381–3390.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  49. Darwin CJ, Sutherland NS (1984) Grouping frequency components of vowels: When is a harmonic not a harmonic? Q J Exp Psychol 36A:193–208.Google Scholar
  50. Darwin CJ, Ciocca V, Sandell GJ (1994) Effects of frequency and amplitude modulation on the pitch of a complex tone with a mistuned harmonic. J Acoust Soc Am 95:2631–2636.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  51. Dau T, Verhey JL (1999) Modeling across-frequency processing of amplitude modulation. In: Dau T, Hohmann V, Kollmeier B (eds) Psychophysics, Physiology and Models of Hearing. Singapore: World Scientific, pp. 229–234.Google Scholar
  52. Dau T, Kollmeier B, Kohlrausch A (1997) Modeling auditory processing of amplitude modulation. I. Detection and masking with narrow-band carriers. J Acoust Soc Am 102:2892–2905.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  53. Dau T, Verhey J, Kohlrausch A (1999) Intrinsic envelope fluctuations and modulation-detection thresholds for narrow-band noise carriers. J Acoust Soc Am 106:2752–2760.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  54. Dau T, Ewert SD, Oxenham AJ (2005) Effects of concurrent and sequential streaming in comodulation masking release. In: Pressnitzer D, de Cheveigné A, McAdams S, Collet L (eds) Auditory Signal Processing: Physiology, Psychoacoustics, and Models. New York: Springer, pp. 335–343.Google Scholar
  55. Deligeorges S, Mountain DC (2004) Frequency, periodicity, and the ICC: A simple model for examining tonotopic and periodotopic axes in the inferior colliculus. Association for Research in Otolaryngology, Daytona Beach, FL.Google Scholar
  56. Dorman MF, Loizou PC, Rainey D (1997) Simulating the effect of cochlear-implant electrode insertion depth on speech understanding. J Acoust Soc Am 102:2993–2996.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  57. Drullman R, Festen JM, Plomp R (1994) Effect of reducing slow temporal modulations on speech reception. J Acoust Soc Am 95:2670–2680.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  58. Durlach NI, Mason CR, Shinn-Cunningham BG, Abrogast TL, Colburn HS, Kidd G (2003) Informational masking: Counteracting the effects of stimulus uncertainty by decreasing target-masker similarity. J Acoust Soc Am 114:368–379.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  59. Eddins DA (1993) Amplitude modulation detection of narrow-band noise: Effects of absolute bandwidth and frequency region. J Acoust Soc Am 93:470–479.Google Scholar
  60. Eddins DA, Wright BA (1994) Comodulation masking release for single and multiple rates of envelope fluctuation. J Acoust Soc Am 96:3432–3442.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  61. Ewert SD, Dau T (2000) Characterizing frequency selectivity for envelope fluctuations. J Acoust Soc Am 108:1181–1196.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  62. Ewert SD, Verhey JL, Dau T (2002) Spectro-temporal processing in the envelope-frequency domain. J Acoust Soc Am 112:2921–2931.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  63. Fantini DA, Moore BCJ (1994) Profile analysis and comodulation detection differences using narrow bands of noise and their relation to comodulation masking release. J Acoust Soc Am 95:2180–2191.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  64. Fantini DA, Moore BCJ, Schooneveldt GP (1993) Comodulation masking release as a function of type of signal, gated or continuous masking, monaural or dichotic presentation of flanking bands, and center frequency. J Acoust Soc Am 93:2106–2115.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  65. Friesen LM, Shannon RV, Baskent D, Wang X (2001) Speech recognition in noise as a function of the number of spectral channels: Comparison of acoustic hearing and cochlear implants. J Acoust Soc Am 110:1150–1163.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  66. Fu QJ, Galvin JJ (2001) Recognition of spectrally asynchronous speech by normal-hearing listeners and Nucleus-22 cochlear implant users. J Acoust Soc Am 109:1166–1172.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  67. Fu QJ, Galvin JJ (2003) The effects of short-term training for spectrally mismatched noise-band speech. J Acoust Soc Am 113:1065–1072.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  68. Füllgrabe C, Moore BCJ, Demany L, Ewert SD, Sheft S, Lorenzi C (2005) Modulation masking produced by second-order modulators. J Acoust Soc Am 117:2158-2168.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  69. Füllgrabe C, Berthommier F, Lorenzi C (2006) Masking release for consonant features in temporally fluctuating background noise. Hear Res 211:74–84.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  70. Garner WR (1974) The Processing of Information and Structure. Potomac, MD: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  71. Garner WR, Hake HW (1951) The amount of information in absolute judgments. Psychol Rev 58:446–459.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  72. Ghitza O (2001) On the upper cutoff frequency of the auditory critical-band envelope detectors in the context of speech perception. J Acoust Soc Am 110:1628–1640.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  73. Gilbert G, Lorenzi C (2006) The ability of listeners to use recovered envelope cues from speech fine structure. J Acoust Soc Am 119:2438–2444.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  74. Giraud A, Lorenzi C, Ashburner J, Wable J, Johnsrude I, Frackowiak R, Kleinschmidt A (2000) Representation of the temporal envelope of sounds in the human brain. J Neurophysiol 84:1588–1598.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  75. Gockel H, Carlyon RP, Deeks JM (2002) Effect of modulator asynchrony of sinusoidal and noise modulators on frequency and amplitude modulation detection interference. J Acoust Soc Am 112:2975–2984.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  76. Goebl W, Parncutt R (2003) Asynchrony versus intensity as cues for melody perception in chords and real music. In: Proceedings of the 5th Triennial Conference of the European Society for Cognitve Science and Music (ESCOM5), Hanover, September 8–13, Germany, pp. 376–380Google Scholar
  77. Gordon JW (1987) The perceptual attack time of musical tones. J Acoust Soc Am 82:88–105.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  78. Gordon PC (2000) Masking protection in the perception of auditory objects. Speech Commun 30:197–206.Google Scholar
  79. Green DM (1993) Auditory intensity discrimination. In: Yost WA, Popper AN, Fay RR (eds) Human Psychophysics. New York: Springer-Verlag, pp. 13–55.Google Scholar
  80. Green DM, Dai H (1992) Temporal relations in profile comparison. In: Cazals Y, Horner K Demany L (eds) Auditory Physiology and Perception. Oxford: Pergamon Press, pp. 471–478.Google Scholar
  81. Green DM, Nguyen QT (1988) Profile analysis: Detecting dynamic spectral changes. Hear Res 32:147–164.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  82. Greenberg S (1996) Understanding speech understanding: Towards a unified theory of speech perception. In: Proceedings of the ESCA Workshop on Auditory Basis of Speech Perception, Keele, England, pp. 1–8.Google Scholar
  83. Greenberg S, Arai T (2001) The relation between speech intelligibility and the complex modulation spectrum. 7th European Conf Speech Comm Tech (Eurospeech-2001), pp. 473–476.Google Scholar
  84. Greenberg S, Kingsbury BED (1997) The modulation spectrogram: In pursuit of an invariant representation of speech. In: Proceedings of the IEEE Int Conf Acoustics Speech Signal Process (ICASSP) 3:1647–1650.Google Scholar
  85. Greenberg S, Arai T, Silipo R (1998) Speech intelligibility derived from exceedingly sparse spectral information. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Spoken Language Process (ICSLP) 6:2803–2806.Google Scholar
  86. Grimault N, Bacon SP, Micheyl C (2002) Auditory stream segregation on the basis of amplitude-modulation rate. J Acoust Soc Am 111:1340–1348.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  87. Grose JH, Hall JW (1993) Comodulation masking release: Is comodulation sufficient? J Acoust Soc Am 93:2896–2902.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  88. Grose JH, Hall JW (1996) Across-frequency processing of multiple modulation patterns. J Acoust Soc Am 99:534–541.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  89. Grose JH, Hall JW, Buss E (2001) Signal detection in maskers with multiple modulations. In: Breebaart DJ, Houtsma AJM, Kohlrausch A, Prijs VF, Schoonhoven R (eds) Physiological and Psychophysical Bases of Auditory Function. Maastricht NL: Shaker Publishing, pp. 258–265.Google Scholar
  90. Grose JH, Hall JW, Buss E, Hatch DR (2005) Detection of spectrally complex signals in comodulated maskers: Effect of temporal fringe. J Acoust Soc Am 118:3774–3782.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  91. Gustafsson HÅ, Arlinger SD (1994) Masking of speech by amplitude-modulated noise. J Acoust Soc Am 95:518–529.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  92. Haggard M (1985) Temporal patterning in speech: The implications of temporal resolution and signal-processing. In: Michelsen A (ed) Time Resolution in Auditory Systems. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 215–237.Google Scholar
  93. Hall JW, Grose JH (1988) Comodulation masking release: Evidence for multiple cues. J Acoust Soc Am 84:1669–1675.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  94. Hall JW, Grose JH (1990) Comodulation masking release and auditory grouping. J Acoust Soc Am 88:119–125.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  95. Hall JW, Grose JH (1991) Some effects of auditory grouping factors on modulation detection interference (MDI). J Acoust Soc Am 90:3028–3035.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  96. Hall JW, Cokely JA, Grose JH (1988) Combined monaural and binaural masking release. J Acoust Soc Am 83:1839–1845.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  97. Hall JW, Grose JH, Mendoza L (1995) Across-channel processes in masking. In: Moore BCJ (ed), Hearing. San Diego: Academic Press, pp. 243–266.Google Scholar
  98. Hall JW, Grose JH, Hatch DR (1996) Effects of masker gating for signal detection in unmodulated and modulated bandlimited noise. J Acoust Soc Am 100:2365–2372.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  99. Hall JW, Buss E, Grose JH (2006) Comodulation detection differences for fixed-frequency and roved-frequency maskers. J Acoust Soc Am 119:1021–1028.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  100. Hanna TE (1984) Discrimination of reproducible noise as a function of bandwidth and duration. Percept Psychophys 36:409–416.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  101. Hartmann WM (1988) Pitch perception and the segregation and integration of auditory entities. In: Edelman GM, Gall WE, Cowan WM (eds) Auditory Function: Neurobiological Bases of Hearing. New York: John Wiley & Sons, pp. 623–645.Google Scholar
  102. Hartmann WM (1998) Signals, Sound, and Sensation. New York: Springer, pp. 412–429.Google Scholar
  103. Hartman WM, Johnson D (1991) Stream segregation and peripheral channeling. Music Percept 9:155–184.Google Scholar
  104. Hatch DR, Arné BC, Hall JW (1995) Comodulation masking release (CMR): Effects of gating as a function of number of flanking bands and masker bandwidth. J Acoust Soc Am 97:3768–3774.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  105. Hawkins S (1995) Arguments for a nonsegmental view of speech perception. In: Proceedings of the XIIIth International Congress on Phonetic Sciences 3:18–25.Google Scholar
  106. Heil P, Schulze H, Langner G (1995) Ontogenetic development of periodicity coding in the inferior colliculus of the Mongolian gerbil. Aud Neurosci 1:363–383.Google Scholar
  107. Hill NI, Bailey PJ (1997) Profile analysis with an asynchronous target: Evidence for auditory grouping. J Acoust Soc Am 102:477–481.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  108. Hou Z, Pavlovic CV (1994) Effects of temporal smearing on temporal resolution, frequency selectivity, and speech intelligibility. J Acoust Soc Am 96:1325–1340.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  109. Houtgast T (1989) Frequency selectivity in amplitude-modulation detection. J Acoust Soc Am 85:1676–1680.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  110. Houtgast T, Steeneken HJM (1973) The modulation transfer function in room acoustics as a predictor of speech intelligibility. Acustica 28:66–73.Google Scholar
  111. Howard-Jones PA, Rosen S (1993) Uncomodulated glimpsing in “checkerboard” noise. J Acoust Soc Am 93:2915–2922.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  112. Hu G, Wang D (2004) Monaural speech segregation based on pitch tracking and amplitude modulation. IEEE Trans Neural Net 15:1135–1150.Google Scholar
  113. Hukin RW, Darwin CJ (1995) Comparison of the effect of onset asynchrony on auditory grouping in pitch matching and vowel identification. Percept Psychophys 57:191–196.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  114. Iverson P (1995) Auditory stream segregation by musical timbre: Effects of static and dynamic acoustic attributes. J Exp Psychol [Hum Percept Perform] 21:751–763.Google Scholar
  115. Joris PX, Schreiner CE, Rees A (2004) Neural processing of amplitude-modulated sounds. Physiol Rev 84:541–577.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  116. Kanedera N, Arai T, Hermansky H, Pavel M (1997) On the importance of various modulation frequencies for speech recognition. In: Proceedings of Eurospeech ’97: Rhodes, September 22–25, Greece. pp. 1079–1082.Google Scholar
  117. Kay RH (1982) Hearing of modulation in sounds. Physiol Rev 62:894–975.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  118. Kidd G, Mason CR, Abrogast TL (2002) Similarity, uncertainty, and masking in the identification on nonspeech auditory patterns. J Acoust Soc Am 111:1367–1376.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  119. Kidd G, Mason CR, Richards VM (2003) Multiple bursts, multiple looks, and stream coherence in the release from informational masking. J Acoust Soc Am 114:2835–2845.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  120. Kohlrausch A, Fassel R, Dau T (2000) The influence of carrier level and frequency on modulation and beat-detection thresholds for sinusoidal carriers. J Acoust Soc Am 108:723–734.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  121. Krishna BS, Semple MN (2000) Auditory temporal processing : Responses to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones in the inferior colliculus. J Physiol 84:255–273.Google Scholar
  122. Kubovy M (1987) Concurrent pitch segregation. In: Yost WA, Watson CS (eds) Auditory Processing of Complex Sounds. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, pp. 299–313.Google Scholar
  123. Kubovy M, Daniel JE (1983) >Pitch segregation by interaural phase, by momentary amplitude disparity, and by monaural phase. J Audio Eng Soc 31:630–635.Google Scholar
  124. Kwon BJ, Turner CW (2001) Consonant identification under maskers with sinusoidal modulation: Masking release or modulation interference? J Acoust Soc Am 110:1130–1140.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  125. Langner G, Schreiner C, Albert M (1992) Tonotopy and periodotopy in the auditory midbrain of cat and guinea fowl. In: Cazals Y, Horner K, Demany L (eds) Auditory Physiology and Perception. Oxford: Pergamon Press, pp. 241–248.Google Scholar
  126. Langner G, Sams M, Heil P, Schulze H (1997) Frequency and periodicity are represented by orthogonal maps in the human auditory cortex: Evidence from magnetoencephalography. J Comp Physiol A 181:665–676.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  127. Langner G, Albert M, Briede T (2002) Temporal and spatial coding of periodicity information in the inferior colliculus of awake chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger). Hear Res 168:110–130.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  128. Lawson JL, Uhlenbeck GE (1950) Threshold Signals, Radiation Laboratory Series, Vol 24. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  129. Lentz JJ, Leek MR, Molis MR (2004) The effect of onset asynchrony on profile analysis by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. J Acoust Soc Am 116:2289–2297.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  130. Loizou PC, Dorman M, Tu Z (1999) On the number of channels needed to understand speech. J Acoust Soc Am 106:2097–2103.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  131. Lorenzi C, Simpson MIG, Millman RE, Griffiths TD, Woods WP, Rees A, Green GGR (2001) Second-order modulation detection thresholds for pure-tone and narrow-band noise carriers. J Acoust Soc Am 110:2470–2478.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  132. Loughlin PJ, Tacer B (1996) On the amplitude- and frequency-modulation decomposition of signals. J Acoust Soc Am 100:1594–1601.Google Scholar
  133. Lu T, Wang X (2004) Information content of auditory cortical responses to time-varying acoustic stimuli. J Neurophysiol 91:301–313.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  134. Lu T, Liang L, Wang X (2001) Temporal and rate representations of time-varying signals in the auditory cortex of awake primates. Nat Neurosci 4:1131–1138.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  135. Lutfi RA (1990) Informational processing of complex sounds. II. Cross-dimensional analysis. J Acoust Soc Am 87:2141–2148.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  136. Lutfi RA (1994) Discrimination of random, time-varying spectra with statistical constraints. J Acoust Soc Am 95:1490–1500.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  137. McCabe SL, Denham MJ (1997) A model of auditory streaming. J Acoust Soc Am 101:1611–1621.Google Scholar
  138. McFadden D (1975) Beat-like interaction between periodic waveforms. J Acoust Soc Am 57:983.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  139. McFadden D (1986) Comodulation masking release: Effects of varying the level, duration, and time delay of the cue band. J Acoust Soc Am 80:1658–1667.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  140. McFadden D, Wright BA (1990) Temporal decline of masking and comodulation detection differences. J Acoust Soc Am 88:711–724.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  141. McFadden D, Wright BA (1992) Temporal decline of masking and comodulation masking release. J Acoust Soc Am 92:144–156.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  142. McNally KA, Handel S (1977) Effect of element composition of streaming and the ordering of repeating sequences. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perf 3:451–460.Google Scholar
  143. Meddis R, Hewitt MJ (1991) Virtual pitch and phase sensitivity of a computer model of the auditory periphery. I: Pitch identification. J Acoust Soc Am 89:2866–2882.Google Scholar
  144. Mendoza L, Hall JW, Grose JH (1995) Modulation detection interference using random and sinusoidal amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 97:2487–2492.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  145. Miller GA, Licklider JCR (1950) The intelligibility of interrupted speech. J Acoust Soc Am 22:167–173.Google Scholar
  146. Miyoshi T, Goto T, Doi T Ishida T, Arai T, Murahara Y (2004) Modulation cepstrum discriminating between speech and environmental noise. Acoust Sci Tech 25:66–69.Google Scholar
  147. Moore BCJ, Alcántara JI (1996) Vowel identification based on amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 99:2332–2343.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  148. Moore BCJ, Borrill SJ (2002) Tests of a within-channel account of comodulation detection differences. J Acoust Soc Am 112:2099–2109.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  149. Moore BCJ, Emmerich DS (1990) Monaural envelope correlation perception, revisited: Effects of bandwidth, frequency separation, duration, and relative level of the noise bands. J Acoust Soc Am 87:2628–2633.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  150. Moore BCJ, Gockel H (2002) Factors influencing sequential stream segregation. Acta Acust 88:320–332.Google Scholar
  151. Moore BCJ, Jorasz U (1992) Detection of changes in modulation depth of a target sound in the presence of other modulated sounds. J Acoust Soc Am 91:1051–1061.Google Scholar
  152. Moore BCJ, Schooneveldt GP (1990) Comodulation masking release as a function of bandwidth and time delay between on-frequency and flanking-band maskers. J Acoust Soc Am 88:725–731.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  153. Moore BCJ, Sek A (2000) Effect of relative phase and frequency spacing on the detection of three-component amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 108:2337–2344.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  154. Moore BCJ, Shailer MJ (1994) Effects of harmonicity, modulator phase, and number of masker components on modulation discrimination interference. J Acoust Soc Am 95:3555–3560.Google Scholar
  155. Moore BCJ, Hall JW, Grose JH, Schooneveldt GP (1990) Some factors affecting the magnitude of comodulation masking release. J Acoust Soc Am 88:1694–1702.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  156. Moore BCJ, Glasberg BR, Gaunt T, Child T (1991) Across-channel masking of changes in modulation depth for amplitude- and frequency-modulated signals. Q J Exp Psychol 43A:327–347.Google Scholar
  157. Moore BCJ, Sek A, Shailer MJ (1995) Modulation discrimination interference for narrow-band noise modulators. J Acoust Soc Am 97:2493–2497.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  158. Nelken I, Rotman Y, Yosef OB (1999) Responses of auditory-cortex neurons to structural features of natural sounds. Nature 397:154–157.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  159. Nelson PB, Jin SH, Carney AE, Nelson DA (2003) Understanding speech in modulated interference: Cochlear implant users and normal-hearing listeners. J Acoust Soc Am 113:961–968.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  160. Oxenham AJ, Dau T (2001) Modulation detection interference: Effects of concurrent and sequential streaming. J Acoust Soc Am 110:402–408.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  161. Pastore RE, Harris LB, Kaplan JK (1982) Temporal order identification: Some parameter dependencies. J Acoust Soc Am 71:430–436.Google Scholar
  162. Patterson JH, Green DM (1970) Discrimination of transient signals having identical energy spectra. J Acoust Soc Am 48:894–905.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  163. Patterson RD, Robinson K, Holdsworth J, McKeown D, Zhang C, Allerhand M (1992) Complex sounds and auditory images. In: Cazals Y, Horner K, Demany L (eds) Auditory Physiology and Perception. Oxford: Pergamon Press, pp. 429–446.Google Scholar
  164. Plomp R (1983) The role of modulation in hearing. In: Klinke R, Hartmann R (eds) Hearing—Physiological Bases and Psychophysics. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 270–276.Google Scholar
  165. Pollack I (1952) The information of elementary auditory displays. J Acoust Soc Am 24:745–749.Google Scholar
  166. Pressnitzer D, McAdams S (1999) An effect of the coherence between envelopes across frequency regions on the perception of roughness. In: Dau T, Hohmann V, Kollmeier B (eds) Psychophysics, Physiology and Models of Hearing. Singapore: World Scientific, pp. 105–108.Google Scholar
  167. Qin MK, Oxenham AJ (2003) Effects of simulated cochlear-implant processing on speech reception in fluctuating maskers. J Acoust Soc Am 114:446–454.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  168. Rappold PW, Mendoza L, Collins MJ (1993) Measuring the strength of auditory fusion for synchronously and nonsynchronously fluctuating narrow-band noise pairs. J Acoust Soc Am 93:1196–1199.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  169. Rasch RA (1978) The perception of simultaneous notes such as in polyphonic music. Acust 40:21–33.Google Scholar
  170. Rasch RA (1979) Synchronization in performed ensemble music. Acustica 43:121–131.Google Scholar
  171. Repp BH (1996) Patterns of note onset asynchronies in expressive piano performance. J Acoust Soc Am 100:3917–3932.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  172. Richards VM (1987) Monaural envelope correlation perception. J Acoust Soc Am 82:1621–1630.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  173. Richards VM (1990) The role of single-channel cues in synchrony perception: The summed waveform. J Acoust Soc Am 88:786–795.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  174. Richards VM, Buss E, Tian L. (1997) Effects of modulator phase for comodulation masking release and modulation detection interference. J Acoust Soc Am 102:468–476.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  175. Roberts B, Holmes SD (2006) Asynchrony and the grouping of vowel components: Captor tones revisited. J Acoust Soc Am 119:2905–2918.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  176. Roberts B, Glasberg BR, Moore BCJ (2002) Primitive stream segregation of tone sequences without differences in fundamental frequency or passband. J Acoust Soc Am 112:2074–2085.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  177. Schooneveldt GP, Moore BCJ (1987) Comodulation masking release (CMR): Effects of signal frequency, flanking-band frequency, masker bandwidth, flanking-band level, and monotic versus dichotic presentation of the flanking band. J Acoust Soc Am 82:1944–1956.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  178. Schooneveldt GP, Moore BCJ (1989) Comodulation masking release (CMR) as a function of masker bandwidth, modulator bandwidth, and signal duration. J Acoust Soc Am 85:273–281.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  179. Schreiner CE, Langner G (1988) Periodicity coding in the inferior colliculus of the cat. II. Topographical organization. J Neurophysiol 60:1823–1840.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  180. Schulze H, Langner G (1997) Periodicity coding in the primary auditory cortex of the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus): Two different coding strategies for pitch and rhythm? J Comp Physiol A 181:651–663.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  181. Shailer MJ, Moore BCJ (1993) Effects of modulation rate and rate of envelope change on modulation discrimination interference. J Acoust Soc Am 94:3138–3143.Google Scholar
  182. Shannon RV, Zeng FG, Kamath V, Wygonski J, Ekelid M (1995) Speech recognition with primarily temporal cues. Science 270:303–304.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  183. Shannon RV, Zeng FG, Wygonski J (1998) Speech recognition with altered spectral distribution of envelope cues. J Acoust Soc Am 104:2467–2476.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  184. Sheft S (2000) Adaptation to amplitude modulation. Association for Research in Otolaryngology, St. Petersburg, FL.Google Scholar
  185. Sheft S, Yost WA (1990) Cued envelope-correlation detection. J Acoust Soc Am (Suppl 1) 88:S145.Google Scholar
  186. Sheft S, Yost WA (1992a) Concurrent pitch segregation based on AM. J Acoust Soc Am 92:2361.Google Scholar
  187. Sheft S, Yost WA (1992b) Spectral transposition of envelope modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 91:2333.Google Scholar
  188. Sheft S, Yost WA (1994) Reproducible noise discrimination with concurrent narrowband noises. J Acoust Soc Am 95:2964.Google Scholar
  189. Sheft S, Yost WA (1997a) Binaural modulation detection interference. J Acoust Soc Am 102:1791–1798.Google Scholar
  190. Sheft S, Yost WA (1997b) Modulation detection interference with two-component masker modulators. J Acoust Soc Am 102:1106–1112.Google Scholar
  191. Sheft S, Yost WA (2000) Joint detection–recognition of amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 107:2880.Google Scholar
  192. Sheft S, Yost WA (2001) AM detection with interrupted modulation. In: Breebaart DJ,Houtsma AJM, Kohlrausch A, Prijs VF, Schoonhoven R (eds) Physiological and Psychophysical Bases of Auditory Function. Maastricht NL: Shaker Publishing, pp. 290–297.Google Scholar
  193. Sheft S, Yost WA (2002) Envelope phase-spectrum discrimination. AFRL Prog Rep 2, contract no SPO700-98-D-4002.Google Scholar
  194. Sheft S,Yost WA (2004) Envelope-phase discrimination. Assoc Res Otolaryngol, Daytona Beach, Florida.Google Scholar
  195. Sheft S, Yost WA (2005) Modulation masking of synchrony detection. Assoc Res Otolaryngol, New Orleans, Louisiana.Google Scholar
  196. Sheft S, Yost WA (2006) Modulation detection interference as informational masking. In: International Symposium on Hearing, Cloppenburg, August 18–23, Germany.Google Scholar
  197. Singh PG, Bregman AS (1997) The influence of different timbre attributes on the perceptual segregation of complex-tone sequences. J Acoust Soc Am 102:1943–1952.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  198. Singh NC, Theunissen FE (2003) Modulation spectra of natural sounds and ethological theories of auditory processing. J Acoust Soc Am 114:3394–3411.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  199. Sinex DG, Henderson J, Li H, Chen GD (2002) Responses of chinchilla inferior colliculus neurons to amplitude-modulated tones with different envelopes. J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 3:390–402.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  200. Slaney M, Lyon RF (1993) On the importance of time—a temporal representation of sound. In: Cooke M, Beet S, Crawford M (eds) Visual Representations of Speech Signals. New York: John Wiley & Sons, pp. 95–116.Google Scholar
  201. Smith ZM, Delgutte B, Oxenham AJ (2002) Chimaeric sounds reveal dichotomies in auditory perception. Nature 416:87–90.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  202. Sorkin RD, Dai H (1994) Signal detection analysis of the ideal group. Org Behav Hum Decis Process 60:1–13.Google Scholar
  203. Souza PE, Turner CW (1996) Effect of single-channel compression on temporal speech information. J Speech Hear Res 39:901–911.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  204. Starr SJ, Metz CE, Lusted LB, Goodenough DJ (1975) Visual detection and localization of radiographic images. Radiol 116:533–538.Google Scholar
  205. Stickney GS, Zeng FG, Litovsky R, Assmann P (2004) Cochlear implant speech recognition with speech maskers. J Acoust Soc Am 116:1081–1091.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  206. Strickland EA, Viemeister NF (1996) Cues for discrimination of envelopes. J Acoust Soc Am 99:3638–3646.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  207. Strickland EA, Viemeister NF (1997) The effects of frequency region and bandwidth on the temporal modulation transfer function. J Acoust Soc Am 102:1799–1810.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  208. Strickland EA, Viemeister NF, Fantini DA, Garrison MA (1989) Within- versus cross-channel mechanisms in detection of envelope phase disparity. J Acoust Soc Am 86:2160–2166.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  209. Strope BP, Alwan AA (2001) Modeling the perception of pitch-rate amplitude modulation in noise. In: Greenberg S, Slaney M (eds) Computational Models of Auditory Function. Amsterdam: IOS Press, pp. 315–327.Google Scholar
  210. Summerfield Q, Culling JF (1992) Auditory segregation of competing voices: absence of effects of FM or AM coherence. Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 336:357–366.Google Scholar
  211. Summerfield Q, Haggard M, Foster J, Gray S (1984) Perceiving vowels from uniform spectra: Phonetic exploration of an auditory aftereffect. Percept Psychophys 35:203–213.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  212. Summerfield Q, Sidwell A, Nelson T (1987) Auditory enhancement of changes in spectral amplitude. J Acoust Soc Am 81:700–708.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  213. Takeuchi AH, Braida LD (1995) Effect of frequency transposition on the discrimination of amplitude envelope patterns. J Acoust Soc Am 97:453–460.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  214. Tansley BW, Suffield JB (1983) Time course of adaptation and recovery of channels selectively sensitive to frequency and amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 74:765–775.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  215. Terhardt E (1974) On the perception of periodic sound fluctuations (roughness). Acust 30:201–213.Google Scholar
  216. van der Horst R, Leeuw AR, Dreschler WA (1999) Importance of temporal-envelope cues in consonant recognition. J Acoust Soc Am 105:1801–1809.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  217. van Noorden LPAS (1975) Temporal coherence in the perception of tone sequences. PhD thesis, Eindhoven: Eindhoven Univ Tech.Google Scholar
  218. van de Par S, Kohlrausch A (1998) Comparison of monaural (CMR) and binaural (BMLD) masking release. J Acoust Soc Am 103:1573–1579.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  219. Van Tasell DJ, Soli SD, Kirby VM, Widin GP (1987) Speech waveform envelope cues for consonant recognition. J Acoust Soc Am 82:1152–1161.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  220. Verhey JL, Dau T, Kollmeier B (1999) Within-channel cues in comodulation masking release (CMR): Experiments and model predictions using a modulation-filterbank model. J Acoust Soc Am 106:2733–2745.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  221. Viemeister NF (1979) Temporal modulation transfer functions based upon modulation thresholds. J Acoust Soc Am 66:1364–1380.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  222. Viemeister NF, Bacon SP (1982) Forward masking by enhanced components in harmonic complexes. J Acoust Soc Am 71:1502–1507.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  223. Viemeister NF, Stellmack MA, Byrne AJ (2005) The role of temporal structure in envelope processing. In: Pressnitzer D, de Cheveigné A, McAdams S, Collet L (eds) Auditory Signal Processing. New York, Springer, pp. 221–229.Google Scholar
  224. Vogel A (1974) Roughness and its relation to the time-pattern of psychoaccoustical excitation. In: Zwiker E, Terhardt E (eds) Facts and Modeling in Hearing. New York: Springer-Verlag, pp. 241–250.Google Scholar
  225. von der Malsburg C, Schneider W (1986) A neural cocktail-party processor. Biol Cybern 54:29–40.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  226. Vos J, Rasch R (1981) The perceptual onset of musical tones. Percept Psychophys 29:323–335.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  227. Wakefield GH (1987) Detection of envelope phase disparity. J Acoust Soc Am (Suppl 1) 82:S34.Google Scholar
  228. Wakefield GH, Viemeister NF (1985) Temporal interactions between pure tones and amplitude-modulated noise. J Acoust Soc Am 77:1535–1542.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  229. Wang D (1996) Primitive auditory segregation based on oscillatory correlation. Cogn Sci 20:409–456.Google Scholar
  230. Wang X, Lu T, Liang L (2003) Cortical processing of temporal modulations. Speech Comm 41:107–121.Google Scholar
  231. Wang X, Lu T, Snider RK, Liang L (2005) Sustained firing in auditory cortex evoked by preferred stimuli. Nature 435:341–346.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  232. Watson CS (2005) Some comments on informational masking. Acta Acust 91:502–512.Google Scholar
  233. Wilson JP (1970) An auditory after-image. In: Plomp R, Smoorenberg GF (eds) Frequency Analysis and Periodicity Detection in Hearing. Leiden: AW Sijthoff, pp. 303–318.Google Scholar
  234. Wojtczak M, Viemeister NF (2005) Forward masking of amplitude modulation: Basic characteristics. J Acoust Soc Am 118:3198–3210.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  235. Wright BA (1990) Comodulation detection differences with multiple signal bands. J Acoust Soc Am 87:292–303.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  236. Wright BA, Dai H (1998) Detection of sinusoidal amplitude modulation at unexpected rates. J Acoust Soc Am 104:2991–2996.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  237. Xu L, Pfingst BE (2003) Relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in lexical-tone perception. J Acoust Soc Am 114:3024–3027.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  238. Xu L, Thompson CS, Pfingst BE (2005) Relative contributions of spectral and temporal cues for phoneme recognition. J Acoust Soc Am 117:3255–3267.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  239. Yost WA (1991) Auditory image perception and analysis: The basis for hearing. Hear Res 56:8–18.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  240. Yost WA, Sheft S (1989) Across-critical-band processing of amplitude-modulated tones. J Acoust Soc Am 85:848–857.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  241. Yost WA, Sheft S (1990) A comparison among three measures of cross-spectral processing of amplitude modulation with tonal signals. J Acoust Soc Am 87:897–900.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  242. Yost WA, Sheft S (1993) Auditory perception. In: Yost WA, Popper AN, Fay RR (eds) Human Psychophysics. New York: Springer-Verlag, pp. 193–236.Google Scholar
  243. Yost WA, Sheft S (1994) Modulation detection interference: Across-frequency processing and auditory grouping. Hear Res 79:48–58.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  244. Yost WA, Sheft S (1997) Temporal modulation transfer functions for tonal stimuli: Gated versus continuous conditions. Aud Neurosci 3:401–414.Google Scholar
  245. Yost WA, Sheft S, Opie J (1989) Modulation interference in detection and discrimination of amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 86:2138–2147.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  246. Yost WA, Dye RH, Sheft S (1995) The synthetic-analytic listening task for modulated signals. J Acoust Soc Am 98:652–655.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  247. Zeng FG, Nie K, Liu S, Stickney G, Del Rio E, Kong YY, Chen H (2004) On the dichotomy in auditory perception between temporal envelope and fine structure cues. J Acoust Soc Am 116:1351–1354.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  248. Zera J, Green DM (1993) Detecting temporal onset and offset asynchrony in multicomponent complexes. J Acoust Soc Am 93:1038–1052.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley Sheft

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations