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Informational Masking

  • Gerald KiddJr.
  • Christine R. Mason
  • Virginia M. Richards
  • Frederick J. Gallun
  • Nathaniel I. Durlach
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 29)

Keywords

Psychometric Function Sensorineural Hearing Loss Target Tone Stream Segregation Auditory Filter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald KiddJr.
  • Christine R. Mason
  • Virginia M. Richards
  • Frederick J. Gallun
  • Nathaniel I. Durlach

There are no affiliations available

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