Advertisement

Living on the Margins: Biobehavioral Adaptations in the Western Great Basin

  • Clark Spencer Larsen
  • Robert L. Kelly
  • Christopher B. Ruff
  • Margaret J. Schoeninger
  • Dale L. Hutchinson
  • Brian E. Hemphill
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Salt Lake City Great Basin Human Remains Physical Anthropology American Museum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bettinger, R. L., 1989, The Archaeology of Pinyon House, Two Eagles, and Crater Middens: Three Residential Sites in Owens Valley, Eastern California, Anthropological Papers 67, American Museum of Natural History, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Blakey, M. L., and Armelagos, G. J., 1985, Deciduous Enamel Defects in Prehistoric Americans from Dickson Mounds, Prenatal and Postnatal Stress, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 66:371–380.Google Scholar
  3. Braidwood, R. J., 1967, Prehistoric Men, 7th ed., Scott, Foresman, Glenview, Illinois.Google Scholar
  4. Bridges, P. S., 1989, Changes in Activities with the Shift to Agriculture in the Southeastern United States, Current Anthropology 30:385–394.Google Scholar
  5. Bridges, P. S., 1992, Prehistoric Arthritis in the Americas, Annual Review of Anthropology 21:67–91.Google Scholar
  6. Bridges, P. S., Blitz, J. H., and Solano, M. C., 2000, Changes in Long Bone Diaphyseal Strength with Horticultural Intensification in West-Central Illinois, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 112:217–238.Google Scholar
  7. Bright, J. R., and Loveland, C. J., 1999, A Biological Perspective on Prehistoric Human Adaptation in the Great Salt Lake Wetlands, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 103–116.Google Scholar
  8. Brock, S. L., and Ruff, C. B., 1988, Diachronic Patterns of Change in Structural Properties of the Femur in the Prehistoric American Southwest, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 75:113–127.Google Scholar
  9. Brooks, S., and Brooks, R. H., 1990, Who Were the Stillwater Marsh People? Halcyon: A Journal of the Humanities 12:63–74.Google Scholar
  10. Brooks, S. T., Haldeman, M. B., and Brooks, R. H., 1988, Osteological Analyses of the Stillwater Skeletal Series, Cultural Resource Series 2, U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  11. Buikstra, J. E., 1988, The Mound-Builders of Eastern North America: A Regional Perspective, Elfde Kroon-Voordracht, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  12. Charles, D. K., and Buikstra, J. E., 1983, Archaic Mortuary Sites in the Central Mississippi Drainage: Distribution, Structure, and Behavioral Implications, in: Archaic Hunters and Gatherers in the American Midwest (J. L. Phillips and J. A. Brown, eds.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 117–145.Google Scholar
  13. Charles, D. K., Buikstra, J. E., and Konigsberg, L. W., 1986, Behavioral Implications of Terminal Archaic and Early Woodland Mortuary Practices in the Lower Illinois Valley, in: Early Woodland Archeology (K. B. Farnsworth and T. E. Emerson, eds.), Kampsville Seminars in Archeology 2, Center for American Archeology, Kampsville, Illinois, pp. 458–474.Google Scholar
  14. Cohen, M. N., and Armelagos, G. J., 1984, Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture, Academic Press, Orlando, Florida.Google Scholar
  15. Coltrain, J. B., and Leavitt, S. W., 2002, Climate and Diet in Fremont Prehistory: Economic Variability and Abandonment of Maize Agriculture in the Great Salt Lake Basin, American Antiquity 67:453–485.Google Scholar
  16. Coltrain, J. B., and Stafford, T. W., Jr., 1999, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Great Salt Lake Wetlands Diet: Towards an Understanding of the Great Basin Formative, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 55–83.Google Scholar
  17. Cybulski, J. S., 1992, A Greenville Burial Ground: Human Remains and Mortuary Elements in British Columbia Coast Prehistory, Archaeological Survey of Canada Mercury Series Paper 146, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Ottawa.Google Scholar
  18. DeNiro, M. J., and Schoeninger, M. J., 1983, Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Bone Collagen: Variations Within Individuals, Between Sexes, and Within Populations Raised on Monotonous Diets, Journal of Archaeological Science 10:199–203.Google Scholar
  19. Domett, K. M., 2001, Health in Late Prehistoric Thailand, British Archaeological Reports International Series (Oxford) S946, Archaeopress, Oxford, England.Google Scholar
  20. Fowler, C. S., 1990, Tule Technology: Northern Paiute Uses of Marsh Resources in Western Nevada, Smithsonian Folklore Studies 6, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  21. Fowler, C. S., 1992, In the Shadow of Fox Peak: An Ethnography of the Cattail-Eater Northern Paiute People of Stillwater Marsh, Cultural Resource Series 5, U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  22. Garn, S. M., 1966, Malnutrition and Skeletal Development in the Pre-School Child, in: Pre-School Child Malnutrition, National Academy of Science, Washington, DC, pp. 43–62.Google Scholar
  23. Garn, S. M., Rohrmann, C. G., Behar, M., Viteri, F., and Guzman, M. A., 1964, Compact Bone Deficiency in Protein-Calorie Malnutrition, Science 145:1444–1445.Google Scholar
  24. Goodman, A. H., and Armelagos, G. J., 1985, The Chronological Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasia in Human Permanent Incisor and Canine Teeth, Archives of Oral Biology 30:503–507.Google Scholar
  25. Goodman, A. H., and Rose, J. C., 1990, Assessment of Systemic Physiological Perturbations from Dental Enamel Hypoplasias and Associated Histological Structures, Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 33:59–110.Google Scholar
  26. Goodman, A. H., and Rose, J. C., 1991, Dental Enamel Hypoplasias as Indicators of Nutritional Status, in: Advances in Dental Anthropology (M. A. Kelley and C. S. Larsen, eds.), Wiley-Liss, New York, pp. 279–292.Google Scholar
  27. Goodman, A. H., Martinez, C., and Chavez, A., 1991, Nutritional Supplementation and the Development of Linear Enamel Hypoplasias in Children from Tezonteopan, Mexico, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53:773–781.Google Scholar
  28. Grayson, D. K., 1993, The Desert’s Past: A Natural Prehistory of the Great Basin, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  29. Guatelli-Steinberg, D., Larsen, C. S., and Hutchinson, D. L., 2004, Prevalence and the Duration of Linear Enamel Hypoplasia: A Comprehensive Study of Neadertals and Inuit Foragers, Journal of Human Evolution 47:65–84.Google Scholar
  30. Guita, J. L., 1984, Oral Pathology, 2nd ed., Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, Maryland.Google Scholar
  31. Heizer, R. F., and Krieger, A. D., 1956, The Archaeology of Humboldt Cave, Churchill County, Nevada, Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 47(1), University of California, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  32. Heizer, R. F., and Napton, L. K., 1970, Archaeology and the Prehistoric Great Basin Lacustrine Subsistence Regime as Seen from Lovelock Cave, Nevada, Contributions of the University of California Archaeological Research Facility 10, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  33. Hemphill, B. E., 1992, An Osteological Analysis of the Human Remains from Malheur Lake, Oregon (3 volumes), U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Cultural Resource Series 6, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  34. Hemphill, B. E., 1999, Wear and Tear: Osteoarthritis as an Indicator of Mobility among Great Basin Hunter-Gatherers, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 241–289.Google Scholar
  35. Hemphill, B. E., 2005, At What Cost a Full Belly? An Investigation of the Seductive Allure of Sedentary Horticulture in the Great Basin, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement 40:113.Google Scholar
  36. Hemphill, B. E., and Larsen, C. S. (eds.), 1999, Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  37. Hill, K., and Hurtado, A. M., 1989, Hunter-Gatherers of the New World, American Scientist 77:436–443.Google Scholar
  38. Hodges, D. C., 1989, Agricultural Intensification and Prehistoric Health in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, Museum of Anthropology Memoirs 22, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  39. Holt, B. M., 2003, Mobility in Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic Europe: Evidence from the Lower Limb, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 122:200–215.Google Scholar
  40. Hough, A. J., Jr., 2001, Pathology of Osteoarthritis, in: Osteoarthritis: Diagnosis and Medical/Surgical Management, 3rd ed. (R. W. Moskowitz, D. S. Howell, R. D. Altman, J. A. Buckwalter and V. M. Goldberg, eds.), W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, pp. 69–100.Google Scholar
  41. Hutchinson, D. L., 2002, Foraging, Farming, and Coastal Biocultural Adaptation in Late Prehistoric North Carolina, University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  42. Hutchinson, D. L., and Larsen, C. S., 1988, Determination of Stress Episode Duration from Linear Enamel Hypoplasias: A Case Study from St. Catherines Island, Georgia, Human Biology 60:93–110.Google Scholar
  43. Hutchinson, D. L., and Larsen, C. S., 1990, Stress and Lifeway Change: The Evidence from Enamel Hypoplasia, in: The Archaeology of Mission Santa Catalina de Guale: 2. Biocultural Interpretations of a Population in Transition (C. S. Larsen, ed.), Anthropological Papers 68, American Museum of Natural History, New York, pp. 50–65.Google Scholar
  44. Hutchinson, D. L., and Larsen, C. S., 1995, Physiological Stress in the Prehistoric Stillwater Marsh: Evidence of Enamel Defects, in: Bioarchaeology of the Stillwater Marsh: Prehistoric Human Adaptation in the Western Great Basin (C. S. Larsen and R. L. Kelly, eds.), Anthropological Papers 77, American Museum of Natural History, New York, pp. 81–95.Google Scholar
  45. Hutchinson, D. L., and Larsen, C. S., 2001, Enamel Hypoplasia and Stress in La Florida, in: Bioarchaeology of Spanish Florida: The Impact of Colonialism (C. S. Larsen, ed.), University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 181–206.Google Scholar
  46. Janetski, J. C., and Madsen, D. B. (eds.), 1990, Wetland Adaptations in the Great Basin: Papers from the Twenty-First Great Basin Anthropological Conference, Museum of Peoples and Cultures Occasional Paper 1, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.Google Scholar
  47. Jennings, J. D., 1957, Danger Cave, University of Utah Anthropological Papers 27, Salt Lake City, Utah.Google Scholar
  48. Jenning, J. D., 1978, Prehistory of Utah and Eastern Great Basin, University of Utah Anthropological Papers 98, Salt Lake City, Utah.Google Scholar
  49. Katzenberg, M. A., 2000, Stable Isotope Analysis: A Tool for Studying Past Diet, Demography, and Life History, in: Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton (M. A. Katzenberg and S. R. Saunders, eds.), Wiley-Liss, New York, pp. 305–327.Google Scholar
  50. Katzenberg, M. A., and Saunders, S. R. (eds.), 2000, Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton, Wiley-Liss, New York.Google Scholar
  51. Kelly, R. L., 1992, Mobility/Sedentism: Concepts, Archaeological Measures, and Effects, Annual Review of Anthropology 21:43–66.Google Scholar
  52. Kelly, R. L., 1995a, The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  53. Kelly, R. L., 1995b, Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways in the Carson Desert: A Context for Bioarchaeology, in: Bioarchaeology of the Stillwater Marsh: Prehistoric Human Adaptation in the Western Great Basin (C. S. Larsen and R. L. Kelly, eds.), Anthropological Papers 77, American Museum of Natural History, New York, pp. 12–32.Google Scholar
  54. Kelly, R. L., 1997, The Late Holocene Prehistory of the Great Basin, Journal of World Prehistory 11:1–49.Google Scholar
  55. Kelly, R. L., 2001, Prehistory of the Carson Desert and Stillwater Mountains: Environment, Mobility, and Subsistence in a Great Basin Wetland, University of Utah Anthropological Papers 123, Salt Lake City, Utah.Google Scholar
  56. Kelly, R. L., 2005, Mustang Shelter: Test Excavation of a Rockshelter in the Stillwater Mountains, Western Nevada, manuscript on file, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, Laramie.Google Scholar
  57. Kent, S., 1992, Studying Variability in the Archaeological Record: An Ethnoarchaeological Model for Distinguishing Mobility Patterns, American Antiquity 57:635–660.Google Scholar
  58. Kreshover, S. J., 1960, Metabolic Disturbances in Tooth Formation, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 85:161–167.Google Scholar
  59. Kreshover, S., and Clough, O. W., 1953a, Prenatal Influences on Tooth Development. I. Alloxan Diabetes in Rats, Journal of Dental Research 32:246–261.Google Scholar
  60. Kreshover, S., and Clough, O. W., 1953b, Prenatal Influences on Tooth Development. II. Artificially Induced Fever in Rats, Journal of Dental Research 32:565–572.Google Scholar
  61. Kuhlbusch, T. A., Lobert, J. M., Crutzen, P. J., and Warneck, P., 1991, Molecular Nitrogen Emissions from Denitrification during Biomass Burning, Nature 351:135–137.Google Scholar
  62. Lambert, P. M. (ed.), 2000, Bioarchaeologial Studies of Life in the Age of Agriculture: A View from the Southeast, University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
  63. Lanyon, L. E., and Rubin, C. T., 1985, Functional Adaptation in Skeletal Structures, in: Functional Vertebrate Morphology (M. Hildebrand, D. M. Bramble, K. F. Liem and D. B. Wake, eds.), Belknap Press and Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, pp. 1–25.Google Scholar
  64. Larsen, C. S., 1997, Bioarchaeology: Interpreting Behavior from the Human Skeleton, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  65. Larsen, C. S. (ed.), 2001, Bioarchaeology of La Florida: The Impact of Colonization, University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  66. Larsen, C. S., 2006, Great Basin: Skeletal Biology, in: Handbook of North American Indians: Environment, Origins, and Population, Volume 3 (W. C. Sturtevant, general ed.), (D. H. Ubelaker, ed.), Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 581–589.Google Scholar
  67. Larsen, C. S., and Hutchinson, D. L., 1992, Dental Evidence for Physiological Disruption: Biocultural Interpretations from the Eastern Spanish Borderlands, in: Recent Contributions to the Study of Enamel Developmental Defects (A. H. Goodman and L. L. Capasso, eds.), Journal of Paleopathology Monographic Publications 2, Associazione Anthropologica Abruzzese, Chieti, Italy, pp. 151–169.Google Scholar
  68. Larsen, C. S., and Kelly, R. L. (eds.), 1995, Bioarchaeology of the Stillwater Marsh: Prehistoric Human Adaptation in the Western Great Basin, Anthropological Papers 77, American Museum of Natural History, New York.Google Scholar
  69. Larsen, C. S., and Milner, G. R. (eds.), 1994, In the Wake of Contact: Biological Responses to Conquest, Wiley-Liss, New York.Google Scholar
  70. Larsen, C. S., Ruff, C. B., and Kelly, R. L., 1995, Structural Analysis of the Stillwater Postcranial Human Remains: Behavioral Implications of Articular Joint Pathology and Long Bone Diaphyseal Morphology, in: Bioarchaeology in the Stillwater Marsh: Prehistoric Human Adaptation in the Western Great Basin (C. S. Larsen and R. L. Kelly, eds.), Anthropological Papers 77, American Museum of Natural History, New York, pp. 107–133.Google Scholar
  71. Ledger, M., Holtzhausen, L.-M., Constant, D., and Morris, A. G., 2000, Biomechanical Beam Analysis of Long Bones from a Late 18th Century Slave Cemetery in Cape Town, South Africa, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 112:207–216.Google Scholar
  72. Lee, R. B., 1979, Kalahari Hunter-Gatherers, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
  73. Lee, R. B., and DeVore, I. (eds.), 1968, Man the Hunter, Aldine, Chicago, Illinois.Google Scholar
  74. Lowie, R. F., 1924, Notes on Shoshonean Ethnography, Anthropological Papers 20(3), American Museum of Natural History, New York.Google Scholar
  75. Mack, M. E., and Coppa, A., 1992, Frequency and Chronological Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasias from the Ra’s al-Hamra-5 (RH5) Skeletal Collection (Oman), in: Recent Contributions to the Study of Enamel Development Defects (A. H. Goodman and L. L. Capasso, eds.), Journal of Paleopathology Monographic Publications 2, Associazione Anthropologica Abruzzese, Chieti, Italy, pp. 131–141.Google Scholar
  76. Mandryk, C. A. S., 1993, Hunter-Gatherer Social Costs and the Nonviability of Submarginal Environments, Journal of Anthropological Research 49:39–71.Google Scholar
  77. Martin, D. L., Akins, N. J., Goodman, A. H., Toll, H. W., and Swedlund, A. C., 2001, Harmony and Discord: Bioarchaeology, Archaeology Notes 242, Office of Archaeological Studies, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe.Google Scholar
  78. Merbs, C. F., 1983, Patterns of Activity-Induced Pathology in a Canadian Inuit Population, Archaeological Survey of Canada Mercury Series Paper 119, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Ottawa.Google Scholar
  79. Nelson, G. C., 1999, Physiologic Stress and Environmental Fluctuation in the Northern Great Basin, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 219–240.Google Scholar
  80. Oetting, A. C., 1999, An Examination of Wetland Adaptive Strategies in Harney Basin: Comparing Ethnographic Paradigms and the Archaeological Record, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 203–218.Google Scholar
  81. Papathanasiou, A., 2001, A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Neolithic Alepotrypa Cave, Greece, British Archaeological Reports International Series (Oxford) S961, Archaeopress, Oxford, England.Google Scholar
  82. Peterson, J., 2002, Sexual Revolutions: Gender and Labor at the Dawn of Agriculture, Altamira Press, Walnut Creek, California.Google Scholar
  83. Pietrusewsky, M., and Douglas, M. T., 2001, Ban Chiang, A Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand I: The Human Skeletal Remains, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  84. Pindborg, J. J., 1982, Aetiology of Developmental Defects Not Related to Fluorosis, International Dental Journal 32:123–134.Google Scholar
  85. Radin, E. L., Paul, I. L., and Rose, R. M., 1972, Role of Mechanical Factors in Pathogenesis of Primary Osteoarthritis, Lancet 1:519–522.Google Scholar
  86. Rafferty, J. E., 1985, The Archaeological Record on Sedentariness: Recognition, Development and Implications, in: Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, Volume 8 (M. B. Schiffer, ed.), Academic Press, Orlando, Florida, pp. 113–156.Google Scholar
  87. Raven, C., 1990, Prehistoric Human Geography in the Carson Desert. Part II. Archaeological Field Tests of Model Predictions, Cultural Resource Series 4, U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  88. Raven, C., and Elston, R. G. (eds.), 1989, Prehistoric Human Geography in the Carson Desert. Part I. A Predictive Model of Land-Use in the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Cultural Resource Series 3, U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  89. Raymond, A. W., and Parks, V. M., 1990, Archaeological Sites Exposed by Recent Flooding of Stillwater Marsh, Carson Desert, Churchill County, Nevada, in: Wetland Adaptations in the Great Basin (J. C. Janetski and D. B. Madsen, eds.), Museum of Peoples and Cultures Occasional Paper 1, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, pp. 33–61.Google Scholar
  90. Reinhard, K. J., 1990, Archaeoparasitology in North America, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 82:145–163.Google Scholar
  91. Robbins, D. M., Rosenberg, K. R., and Ruff, C. B., 1989, Activity Patterns in Late Middle Woodland, Delaware, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 78:290–291.Google Scholar
  92. Rose, J. C., Burnett, B. A., Nassaney, M. S., and Blaeuer, M. W., 1984, Paleopathology and the Origins of Maize Agriculture in the Lower Mississippi Valley and Caddoan Culture Areas, in: Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture (M. N. Cohen and G. J. Armelagos, eds.), Academic Press, Orlando, Florida, pp. 393–424.Google Scholar
  93. Ruff, C. B., 1987, Sexual Dimorphism in the Human Lower Limb Bone Structure: Relationship to Subsistence Strategy and Sexual Division of Labor, Journal of Human Evolution 16:391–416.Google Scholar
  94. Ruff, C. B., 1991, Aging and Osteoporosis in Native Americans from Pecos Pueblo, New Mexico, Garland, New York.Google Scholar
  95. Ruff, C. B., 1994, Biomechanical Analysis of Northern and Southern Plains Femora: Behavioral Implications, in: Skeletal Biology in the Great Plains: A Multidisciplinary View (D. W. Owsley and R. L. Jantz, eds.), Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 235–245.Google Scholar
  96. Ruff, C. B., 1999, Skeletal Structure and Behavioral Patterns of Prehistoric Great Basin Populations, in: Understanding Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 290–320.Google Scholar
  97. Ruff, C. B., 2000, Biomechanical Analyses of Archaeological Human Skeletons, in: Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton (M. A. Katzenberg and S. R. Saunders, eds.), Wiley-Liss, New York, pp. 71–102.Google Scholar
  98. Ruff, C. B., and Larsen, C. S., 2001, Reconstructing Behavior in Spanish Florida: The Biomechanical Evidence, in: Bioarchaeology of Spanish Florida: The Impact of Colonialism (C. S. Larsen, ed.), University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 113–145.Google Scholar
  99. Ruff, C. B., Trinkaus, E., Walker, A., and Larsen, C. S., 1993, Postcranial Robusticity in Homo. I. Temporal Trends and Mechanical Interpretation, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 91:21–53.Google Scholar
  100. Sahlins, M., 1972, Stone Age Economics, Aldine, Chicago, Illinois.Google Scholar
  101. Sarnat, B. G., and Schour, I., 1941, Enamel Hypoplasia (Chronologic Enamel Aplasia) in Relation to Systemic Disease: A Chronologic, Morphologic and Etiologic Classification, Journal of the American Dental Association 28:1989–2000.Google Scholar
  102. Sarnat, B. G., and Schour, I., 1942, Enamel Hypoplasia (Chronologic Enamel Aplasia) in Relation to Systemic Disease: A Chronologic, Morphologic and Etiologic Classification, Journal of the American Dental Association 29:67–77.Google Scholar
  103. Schoeninger, M. J., 1995, Dietary Reconstruction in the Prehistoric Carson Desert: Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Analysis, in: Bioarchaeology in the Stillwater Marsh: Prehistoric Human Adaptation in the Western Great Basin (C. S. Larsen and R. L. Kelly, eds.), Anthropological Papers 77, American Museum of Natural History, New York, pp. 96–106.Google Scholar
  104. Schoeninger, M. J., 1999, Prehistoric Subsistence Strategies in the Stillwater Marsh Region of the Carson Desert, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 151–166.Google Scholar
  105. Schoeninger, M. J., and Moore, K., 1992, Bone Stable Isotope Studies in Archaeology, Journal of World Prehistory 6:247–296.Google Scholar
  106. Schoeninger, M. J., DeNiro, M. J., and Tauber, H., 1983, Stable Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Bone Collagen Reflect Marine and Terrestrial Components of Prehistoric Human Diet, Science 220:1381–1383.Google Scholar
  107. Schwarcz, H. P., and Schoeninger, M. J., 1991, Stable Isotope Analyses in Human Nutritional Ecology, Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 34:283–321.Google Scholar
  108. Sharma, L., 2001, Epidemiology of Osteoarthritis, in: Osteoarthritis: Diagnosis and Medical/Surgical Management, 3rd ed. (R. W. Moskowitz, D. S. Howell, R. D. Altman, J. A. Buckwalter and V. M. Goldberg, eds.), W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, pp. 3–27.Google Scholar
  109. Simms, S. R., 1999, Farmers, Foragers, and Adaptive Diversity, in: Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation (B. E. Hemphill and C. S. Larsen, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 21–54.Google Scholar
  110. Simpson, J. H., 1876, Report of Explorations Across the Great Basin of the Territory of Utah for a Direct Wagon-Route from Camp Floyd to Genoa, in Carson Valley, in 1859, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  111. Skinner, M. F., and Hung, J. T. W., 1989, Social and Biological Correlates of Localized Enamel Hypoplasia of the Human Deciduous Canine Tooth, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 79:159–175.Google Scholar
  112. Steckel, R. H., and Rose, J. C. (eds.), 2002, The Backbone of History: Health and Nutrition in the Western Hemisphere, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Google Scholar
  113. Steinbock, R. T., 1976, Paleopathological Diagnosis and Interpretation: Bone Diseases in Ancient Human Populations, Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois.Google Scholar
  114. Steward, J. H., 1938, Basin-Plateau Aboriginal Sociopolitical Groups, Bulletin 120, Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  115. Stock, J. T., and Pfeiffer, S. K., 2001, Linking Structural Variability in Long Bone Diaphyses to Habitual Behaviors: Foragers from the Southern African Later Stone Age and the Andaman Islands, American Journal of Physical Anthropology 115:337–348.Google Scholar
  116. Stock, J. T., and Pfeiffer, S. K., 2004, Long Bone Robusticity and Subsistence Behaviour among Later Stone Age Foragers of the Forest and Fynbos Biomes of South Africa, Journal of Archaeological Science 31:999–1013.Google Scholar
  117. Suckling, G., 1989, Developmental Defects of Enamel-Historical and Present-Day Perspectives of Their Pathogenesis, Advances in Dental Research 3:87–94.Google Scholar
  118. Suckling, G., Elliot, D. C., and Thurley, D. C., 1986, The Macroscopic Appearance and Associated Histological Changes in the Enamel Organ of Hypoplastic Lesions of Sheep Incisor Teeth Resulting from Induced Parasitism, Archives of Oral Biology 31:427–439.Google Scholar
  119. Suckling, G., and Thurley, D. C., 1984, Developmental Defects of Enamel: Factors Influencing Their Macroscopic Appearance, in: Tooth Enamel IV (R. W. Fearnhead and S. Suga, eds.), Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 357–362.Google Scholar
  120. Ten Cate, A. R., 1994, Oral Histology: Development, Structure, and Function, 4th ed., C. V. Mosby, St. Louis, Missouri.Google Scholar
  121. Thomas, D. H. 1985, The Archaeology of Hidden Cave, Nevada, Anthropological Papers 61(1), American Museum of Natural History, New York.Google Scholar
  122. Thomas, D. H. (ed.), 1988, The Archaeology of Monitor Valley: 3. Survey and Additional Excavations, Anthropological Papers 66(2), American Museum of Natural History, New York.Google Scholar
  123. Tieszen, L. L., 1991, Natural Variations in the Carbon Isotope Values of Plants: Implications for Archaeology, Ecology, and Paleoecology, Journal of Archaeological Science 18:227–248.Google Scholar
  124. Tuohy, D. R., Dansie, A. J., and Haldeman, M. B., 1987, Final Report on Excavations in the Stillwater Marsch Archaeological District, Nevada, Archaeological Services Reports, Nevada State Museum, Carson City.Google Scholar
  125. Ubelaker, D. H., 1992, Enamel Hypoplasia in Ancient Ecuador, in: Recent Contributions to the Study of Enamel Developmental Defects (A. H. Goodman and L. L. Capasso, eds.), Journal of Paleopathology Monographic Publications 2, Associazione Antropologica Abruzzese, Chieti, Italy, pp. 207–217.Google Scholar
  126. Ubelaker, D. H., 1994, The Biological Impact of European Contact in Ecuador, in: In the Wake of Contact: Biological Responses to Conquest (C. S. Larsen and G. R. Milner, eds.), Wiley-Liss, New York, pp. 147–160.Google Scholar
  127. Vogel, J. C., Talma, A. S., Hall-Martin, A. J., and Viljoen, P. J., 1990, Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Elephants, South African Journal of Science 86:147–150.Google Scholar
  128. Wheat, M. M., 1967, Survival Arts of the Primitive Paiutes, University of Nevada Press, Reno.Google Scholar
  129. Whittington, S. L., and Reed, D. M. (eds.), 1997, Bone of the Maya: Studies of Ancient Skeletons, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  130. Williamson, R. F., and Pfeiffer, S. (eds.), 2003, Bones of the Ancestors: The Archaeology and Osteobiography of the Moatfield Ossuary, Canadian Museum of Civilization Mercury Series 163, Gatineau, Quebec.Google Scholar
  131. Wing, E. S., and Brown, A. B., 1979, Paleonutrition: Method and Theory in Prehistoric Foodways, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  132. Winterhalder, B., 1993, Work, Resources and Population in Foraging Societies, Man 28:321–340.Google Scholar
  133. Witkop, C., 1970, Heritable Disorders, in: Thoma’s Oral Pathology, Volume 2 (R. Gorlin and H. Goldman, eds.), C. V. Mosby, St. Louis, Missouri, pp. 635–637.Google Scholar
  134. Zeannah, D. W., 1996, Predicting Settlement Patterns and Mobility Strategies: An Optimal Foraging Analysis of Hunter-Gatherer Use of Mountain, Desert, and Wetland Habitats in the Carson Desert, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  135. Zeannah, D. W., 2004, Sexual Division of Labor and Central Place Foraging: A Model for the Carson Desert of Western Nevada, Journal of Archaeological Archaeology 23:1–32.Google Scholar
  136. Zeannah, D. W., Carter, J. A., Dugas, D. P., Elston, R. G., and Hammett, J. E., 1995, An Optimal Foraging Model of Hunter-Gatherer Land Use in the Carson Desert, Report to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of Navy, Portland, Oregon.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clark Spencer Larsen
  • Robert L. Kelly
  • Christopher B. Ruff
  • Margaret J. Schoeninger
  • Dale L. Hutchinson
  • Brian E. Hemphill

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations