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Crop Husbandry Practices in North America’s Eastern Woodlands

  • C. Margaret Scarry
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Husbandry Practice Accelerator Mass Spectrometry American Antiquity World Archaeology Archaic Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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  • C. Margaret Scarry

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