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Environmental Archaeology and Historical Archaeology

  • Kathleen A. Deagan
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Smithsonian Institution Historical Archaeology Faunal Remains Subsistence Strategy American Antiquity 
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  • Kathleen A. Deagan

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