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Who Ate What? Archaeological Food Remains and Cultural Diversity

  • Elizabeth M. Scott
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Domestic Animal Wild Bird Socioeconomic Position Historical Archaeology Wild Mammal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth M. Scott

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