Advertisement

The Emergence of Maize Farming in Northwest Mexico

  • Robert J. Hard
  • Karen R. Adams
  • John R. Roney
  • Kari M. Schmidt
  • Gayle J. Fritz
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Salt Lake City American Antiquity Maize Farming Amaranth Seed Agricultural Adaptation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, J., 2002, Ground Stone Analysis, A Technological Approach, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  2. Adams, K. R., 1994, A Regional Synthesis of Zea mays in the Prehistoric American Southwest, in: Corn and Culture in the Prehistoric New World (S. Johannessen and C. A. Hastorf, eds.), Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 273–302.Google Scholar
  3. Adams, K. R., 2004, Anthropogenic Ecology of the North American Southwest, in: People and Plants in Ancient Western North America (P. E. Minnis, ed.), Smithsonian Books, Washington, DC, pp. 167–204.Google Scholar
  4. Adams, K. R, and Bohrer, V. L., 1998, Archaeobotanical Indicators of Seasonality: Examples from Arid Southwestern United States, in: Seasonality and Sedentism, Archaeological Perspectives from Old and New World Sites (T. R. Rocek and O. Bar-Yosef, eds.), Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Bulletin 6, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, pp. 129–141.Google Scholar
  5. Adams, K. R, and Hanselka, J. K., 2005, Plant Use in the Late Archaic Period, in: Early Farming and Warfare in Northwest Mexico (R. J. Hard and J. R. Roney, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, manuscript in preparation.Google Scholar
  6. Barlow, K. R., 2002, Predicting Maize Agriculture Among the Fremont: An Economic Comparison of Farming and Foraging in the American Southwest, American Antiquity 67(1):65–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Benz, B. F., 2006, Maize in the Americas, in: Histories of Maize: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Prehistory, Linguistics, Biogeography, Domestication, and Evolution of Maize (J. Staller, R. Tykot and B. Benz, eds.), Academic Press, Burlington, Massachusetts, pp. 9–20.Google Scholar
  8. Benz, B. F, and Long, A., 2000, Prehistoric Maize Evolution in the Tehuacan Valley, Current Anthropology 41(3):459–465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Benz, B. F, and Staller, J. E., 2006, The Antiquity, Biogeography, and Culture History of Maize in the Americas, in: Histories of Maize: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Prehistory, Linguistics, Biogeography, Domestication, and Evolution of Maize (J. Staller, R. Tykot, and B. Benz, eds.), Academic Press, Burlington, Massachusetts, pp. 665–673.Google Scholar
  10. Bohrer, V. L., 1962, Nature and Interpretation of Ethnobotanical Materials from Tonto National Monument, in: Archaeological Studies of Tonto National Monument, Arizona (C. R. Steen, L. M. Pierson, V. L. Bohrer, and K. P. Kent, eds.), Southwestern Monuments Association Technical Series Volume 2, Globe, Arizona, p.p. 75–114.Google Scholar
  11. Bohrer, V. L., 1991, Recently Recognized Cultivated and Encouraged Plants Among the Hohokam, Kiva 56:227–235.Google Scholar
  12. Bohrer, V. L, and Adams, K. R., 1977, Ethnobotanical Techniques and Approaches at Salmon Ruin, New Mexico, Eastern New Mexico University Contributions in Anthropology 8(1):1–220.Google Scholar
  13. Bowers, J. E, and McLaughlin, S. P., 1982, Plant Species Diversity in Arizona, Madroño 29:227–233Google Scholar
  14. Carpenter, J. P, Sanchez, G, and Villalpando C. M. E., 2003, Sonora Precerámica: del Arcaico y del Surgimiento de Aldeas Agrícolas, Arqueología 29:5–29.Google Scholar
  15. Carpenter, J. P, Sanchez, G, and Villalpando C. M. E., 2005, The Late Archaic/Early Agricultural Period in Sonora, Mexico, in: The Late Archaic Across the Borderlands: From Foraging to Farming (B. J. Vierra, ed.), University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 13–40.Google Scholar
  16. Cohen, M. N., 1987, The Significance of Long-Term Changes in Human Diet and Food Economy, in: Food and Evolution: Toward a Theory of Human Food Habits (M. Harris and E. B. Ross, eds), Temple University Press, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pp. 261–283.Google Scholar
  17. Cole, J., 1979, Amaranth: From the Past for the Future, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  18. Coltrain, J. B, Janetski, J. C, and Carlyle, S. W., 2006, The Stable and Radio-Isotope Chemistry of Eastern Basketmaker and Pueblo Groups in the Four Corners Region of the American Southwest: Implications for Anasazi Diets, Origins, and Abandonments in Southwestern Colorado, in: Histories of Maize: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Prehistory, Linguistics, Biogeography, Domestication, and Evolution of Maize (J. Staller, R. Tykot and B. Benz, eds.), Academic Press, Burlington, Massachusetts, pp. 275–287.Google Scholar
  19. Diehl, M. W., 1997, Rational Behavior, the Adoption of Agriculture, and the Organization of Subsistence During the Late Archaic Period in the Greater Tucson Basin, in: Rediscovering Darwin (C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, eds.), Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association 7:251–265.Google Scholar
  20. Ely, L. L., 1997, Response of Extreme Floods in the Southwestern United States to Climatic Variations in the Late Holocene, Geomorphology 19:175–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Fritz, G. J., 2005, Amaranth and Chenopod Seeds from Early Agricultural Cerros de Trincheras Sites, in: Early Farming and Warfare in Northwest Mexico (R. J. Hard and J. R. Roney, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, manuscript in preparation.Google Scholar
  22. Gasser, R. E, and Kwiatkowski, S. M., 1991, Food for Thought: Recognizing Patterns in Hohokam Subsistence, in: Exploring the Hohokam: Prehistoric Desert Peoples of the American Southwest (G. J. Gumerman, ed.), University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, pp. 417–459.Google Scholar
  23. Gregory, D. A., 1999, Data Integration and Synthesis, in: Excavations in the Santa Cruz River Floodplain: The Middle Archaic Component at Los Pozos (D. A. Gregory, ed.), Anthropological Papers 20, Center for Desert Archaeology, Tucson, Arizona, pp. 85–123.Google Scholar
  24. Gregory, D. A, and Diehl, M. W., 2002, Duration, Continuity, and Intensity of Occupation at a Late Cienega Phase Settlement in the Santa Cruz River Floodplain, in: Traditions, Transitions, and Technologies: Themes in Southwestern Archaeology, Proceedings of the 2000 Southwest Symposium (S. H. Schlanger, ed.), University Press of Colorado, Boulder, pp. 200–223.Google Scholar
  25. Hames, R., 1992, Time Allocation, in: Evolutionary Ecology and Human Behavior (E. Alden Smith and B Winterhalder, eds.), Aldine de Gruyter, New York, pp. 203–235.Google Scholar
  26. Hard, R. J, Mauldin, R. P, and Raymond, G. R., 1996, Mano Size, Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios, and Macrobotanical Remains as Multiple Lines of Evidence of Maize Dependence in the American Southwest, Journal Archaeological Method and Theory 3:253–318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Hard, R. J, MacWilliams, A. C, Roney, J. R, Adams, K. R, and Merrill, W. L., 2006, Early Agriculture in Chihuahua, Mexico, in: Histories of Maize: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Prehistory, Linguistics, Biogeography, Domestication, and Evolution of Maize (J. Staller, R. Tykot and B. Benz, eds.), Academic Press, Burlington, Massachusetts, pp. 471–485.Google Scholar
  28. Hard, R. J, and Roney, J. R., 1998, A Massive Terraced Village Complex in Chihuahua, Mexico, 3000 Years Before Present, Science 279 (5357):1661–1664.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Hard, R. J, and Roney, J. R., 2004, Late Archaic Period Hilltop Settlements in Northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico, in: Identity, Feasting, and the Archaeology of the Greater Southwest (B. Mills, ed.), University of Colorado Press, Boulder, pp. 276–294.Google Scholar
  30. Hard, R. J, and Roney, J. R. (eds.), 2005a, Early Farming and Warfare in Northwest Mexico, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, manuscript in preparation.Google Scholar
  31. Hard, R. J, and Roney, J. R., 2005b, The Transition to Farming on the Rio Casas Grandes and in the Southern Jornada Mogollon Region in the North American Southwest, in: Current Research on the Late Archaic Across the Borderlands: From Foraging to Farming (B. Vierra, ed.), University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 141–186.Google Scholar
  32. Hard, R. J, and Roney, J. R., 2007, Cerros de Trincheras in Northwestern Chihuahua: The Arguments for Defense, in: Enduring Borderlands Traditions: Trincheras Sites in Time, Space and Society (S. K. Fish, P. R. Fish, and E. Villalpando, eds.), University of Arizona Press, Tucson, in press.Google Scholar
  33. Hard, R. J, Zapata, J. E, Moses, B. K, and Roney, J. R., 1999, Terrace Construction in Northern Chihuahua, Mexico: 1150 B.C. and Modern Experiments, Journal of Field Archaeology 26(2):129–146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Haury, E. W., 1962, The Greater American Southwest, in: Courses Toward Urban Life (R. J. Braidwood and G. R. Willey, eds.), Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology 32, Wenner- Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, New York, pp. 106–131.Google Scholar
  35. Horsfall, G. A., 1987, A Design Theory Perspective on Variability in Grinding Stones, in: Lithic Studies Among the Contemporary Highland Maya (B. Hayden, ed.), University of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 333–375.Google Scholar
  36. Huber, E. K., 2005, Early Maize at the Old Corn Site (LA 137258), in: Fence Lake Project: Archaeological Data Recovery in the New Mexico Transportation Corridor and First Five-Year Permit Area, Fence Lake Coal Mine Project, Catron County, New Mexico, Synthetic Studies and Summary (E. K. Huber and C. R. Van West, eds.), Technical Series 84, Volume 4, Statistical Research, Tucson, Arizona, pp. 36.1–36.33.Google Scholar
  37. Huckell, B. B., 1995, Of Marshes and Maize, Preceramic Agricultural Settlements in the Cienega Valley, Southeastern Arizona, Anthropological Papers 59, University of Arizona Press, Tucson.Google Scholar
  38. Huckell, B. B., 1996, The Archaic Prehistory of the North American Southwest, Journal of World Prehistory 10(3):305–373.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Huckell, B. B, Huckell, L. W, and Shackley, M. S., 1999, McEuen Cave, Archaeology Southwest 13(1):12.Google Scholar
  40. LeBlanc, S. A., 1999, Prehistoric Warfare in the American Southwest, The University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  41. Long, A, Benz, B. F, Donahue, D. J, Jull, A. J. T, and Toolin, L. J., 1989, First Direct AMS Dates on Early Maize from Tehuacán, Mexico, Radiocarbon 3:1035–1040.Google Scholar
  42. Mabry, J. B., 1998, Conclusions, in: Archaeological Investigations of Early Village Sites in the Middle Santa Cruz Valley: Analysis and Synthesis, Part II (J. B. Mabry, ed.), Anthropological Papers 19, Center for Desert Archaeology, Tucson, Arizona, pp. 757–791.Google Scholar
  43. Mabry, J. B., 2002, The Role of Irrigation in the Transition to Agriculture and Sedentism in the Southwest: A Risk Management Model, in: Traditions, Transitions, and Technologies: Themes in Southwestern Archaeology, Proceedings of the 2000 Southwest Symposium (S. H. Schlanger, ed.), University of Colorado Press, Boulder, pp. 178–199.Google Scholar
  44. Mabry, J. B, Swartz, D. L, Wöcherl, H, Clark, J. J, Archer, G. H, and Lindeman, M. W., 1997, Archaeological Investigations of Early Village Sites in the Middle Santa Cruz Valley: Description of the Santa Cruz Bend, Square Hearth, Stone Pipe, and Canal Sites. Anthropological Papers 18, Center for Desert Archaeology, Tucson, Arizona.Google Scholar
  45. MacWilliams, A. C, Hard, R. J, Roney, J. R, Adams, K. A, Merrill, W. L., 2008, The Setting of Early Agriculture in Southern Chihuahua, Mexico, in: Archaeology Without Borders: Contact, Commerce and Change in the U.S. Southwest and Northwestern Mexico (L. Webster and M. McBrinn, eds.). University Press of Colorado, Boulder, in pressGoogle Scholar
  46. Mangelsdorf, P. C., 1986, The Origin of Corn, Scientific American 255(2):80–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Martin, A. C, and Barkley, W. D., 1961, Seed Identification Manual, University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  48. Matson, R. G., 1991, The Origins of Southwestern Agriculture, University of Arizona Press, Tucson.Google Scholar
  49. Matson, R. G, and Chisholm, B., 1991, Basketmaker II Subsistence: Carbon Isotopes and Other Dietary Indicators from Cedar Mesa, Utah, American Antiquity 56(3):444–459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Matsuoka, Y, Vigouroux, Y, Goodman, M. M, Sanchez G. J, Buckler, E, and Doebley, J., 2002, A Single Domestication for Maize Shown by Multilocus Microsatellite Genotyping, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 99(9):6080–6084.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. McClung de Tapia, E, González Vázquez, J, Zurita Noguera, J, and Morales, E. I., 1996, La Domesticación Prehispánica de Amaranthus spp. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Cuadernos de Trabajo IIa, Mexico, DF.Google Scholar
  52. Miksicek, C. H., 1987, Late Sedentary-Early Classic Period Hohokam Agriculture: Plant Remains from the Marana Community Complex, in: Studies in the Hohokam Community of Marana (G. E. Rice, ed.), Office of Cultural Resource Management, Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University, Tempe, pp. 197–216.Google Scholar
  53. Minnis, P. E., 1992, Earliest Plant Cultivation in the Desert Borderlands of North America: An International Perspective, in: The Origins of Agriculture (C. W. Cowan and P. J. Watson, eds.), Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 121–141.Google Scholar
  54. Montero, C, Carpenter, J, Barnes, E, Rohn, A, and Watson, J., 2004, Early Agricultural Period Burials at La Playa (SON F. 10:03), Sonora, Mexico: Further Preliminary Results, paper presented at the 69th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Montreal.Google Scholar
  55. Morris, D. H., 1990, Changes in Groundstone Following the Introduction of Maize in the American Southwest, Journal of Anthropological Research 46:177–194.Google Scholar
  56. Nabhan, G. P., 1979, Grain Amaranth and Other Rare Crops of Northern Mexico, Dry Country News 3:20–22.Google Scholar
  57. National Research Council, 1985, Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Report of an Ad Hoc Panel of the Advisory Committee on Technology Innovation Board on Science and Technology for International Development, Office of International Affairs, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  58. Nordt, L., 2003, Late Quaternary Fluvial Landscape Evolution in Desert Grasslands of Northern Chihuahua, Mexico, Geological Society of America Bulletin 115:596–606. ]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Ortega-Ramírez, J. R, Valiente-Banuet, A, U.rrutia-Fucugauchi, J, M.ortera-Gutiérrez, C. A, and Alvarado-Valdez, G., 1998, Paleoclimatic Changes during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene in the Laguna Babícora, near the Chihuahuan Desert, México, Canadian Journal of Earth Science 35:1168–1179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Piperno, D. R, and Flannery, K. V., 2001, The Earliest Archaeological Maize (Zea mays L.) from Highland Mexico: New Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Dates and Their Implications, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 98(4):2101–2103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Roney, J. R, and Hard, R. J., 2002, Early Agriculture in Northwestern Chihuahua, in: Traditions, Transitions, and Technologies: Themes in Southwestern Archaeology, Proceedings of the 2000 Southwest Symposium (S. Schlanger, ed.), University of Colorado Press, Boulder, pp. 163–180.Google Scholar
  62. Roney, J. R, and Hard, R. J., 2004, A Review of Cerros de Trincheras in Northwestern Chihuahua, in: Surveying the Archaeology of Northwest Mexico (G. E. Newell and E. Gallaga, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 127–148.Google Scholar
  63. Roosevelt, A. C., 1984, Population, Health, and the Evolution of Subsistence: Conclusions from the Conference, in: Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture (M. N. Cohen and G. J. Armelagos, eds.), Academic Press, Orlando, pp. 572–574.Google Scholar
  64. Sauer, J. D., 1950, The Grain Amaranths: A Survey of Their History and Classification, Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 37:561–632.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Sauer, J. D., 1967, The Grain Amaranths and their Relatives: A Revised Taxonomic and Geographic Survey, Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 54(2):103–137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Sauer, J. D., 1969, Identity of Archaeological Grain Amaranths from the Valley of Tehuacan, Puebla, Mexico, American Antiquity 34:80–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Sauer, J. D., 1993, Historical Geography of Crop Plants: A Select Roster, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida.Google Scholar
  68. Schmidt, K. M., 2005, Faunal Remains, in: Early Farming and Warfare in Northwest Mexico (R. J. Hard and J. R. Roney, eds.), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, manuscript in preparation.Google Scholar
  69. Schurr, M. R, and Gregory, D. A., 2002, Fluoride Dating of Faunal Materials by Ion-Selective Electrode: High Resolution Relative Dating at an Early Agricultural Period Site in the Tucson Basin, American Antiquity 67(2):281–299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Shackley, S., 2005, Chronometry and Geochemistry at McEuen Cave: The Radiocarbon and Obsidian Geochemical Data, paper presented at the 70th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Salt Lake City, Utah.Google Scholar
  71. Sliva, R. J. (ed.), 2005, Material Culture and Lifeways of Early Agricultural Communities in Southern Arizona, Center for Desert Archaeology, Anthropological Papers 35, Tucson, Arizona.Google Scholar
  72. Smith, B. D., 1997, Reconsidering the Ocampo Caves and the Era of Incipient Cultivation in Mesoamerica, Latin American Antiquity 8:342–383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Smith, B. D., 2001a, Documenting Plant Domestication: The Consilience of Biological and Archaeological Approaches, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98(4):1324–1326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Smith, B. D., 2001b, Low-level Food Production, Journal of Archaeological Research 9(1):1–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Smith, B. D., 2005, Reassessing Coxcatlan Cave and the Early History of Domesticated Plants in Mexico, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 102(27):9438–9445.Google Scholar
  76. Swanson, S. J., 2003, Documenting Prehistoric Communication Networks: A Case Study in the Paquime’ Polity, American Antiquity 68:753–769.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Wills, C. H., 1985, Early Prehistoric Agriculture in the American Southwest, School of American Research Press, Santa Fe, New Mexico.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Hard
  • Karen R. Adams
  • John R. Roney
  • Kari M. Schmidt
  • Gayle J. Fritz

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations