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What Seasonal Diet at a Fort Ancient Community Reveals About Coping Mechanisms

  • Gail E. Wagner
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Black Walnut World Archaeology Seasonal Diet Flotation Sample Late Prehistoric 
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  • Gail E. Wagner

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