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Pathoecology of Two Ancestral Pueblo Villages

  • Karl J. Reinhard
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Archaeological Investigation Prickly Pear Wild Plant Food Juniper Berry Porotic Hyperostosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© Springer Science + Business Media LLC 2008

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  • Karl J. Reinhard

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