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Introduction to Environmental Archaeology

  • Elizabeth J. Reitz
  • Lee A. Newsom
  • Sylvia J. Scudder
  • C. Margaret Scarry
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Keywords

Archaeological Site Human Ecology Landscape Evolution Social Complexity Archaeological Investigation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth J. Reitz
  • Lee A. Newsom
  • Sylvia J. Scudder
  • C. Margaret Scarry

There are no affiliations available

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