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Promoting Self-Change: Taking the Treatment to the Community

  • Linda Carter Sobell
  • Mark B. Sobell

As discussed in detail in Chapter 1, the vast majority of people with alcohol and drug problems are unlikely to enter traditional substance abuse or addiction treatment programs (Harris & Mckellar, 2003). Several major U.S. surveys have concluded that only a small percentage of individuals with alcohol problems ever seek and enter into treatment (Dawson, Grant, Stinson, et al., 2005; Raimo, Daeppen, Smith, Danko, & Schuckit, 1999).

Keywords

Smoking Cessation Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Drinking Behavior Alcohol Problem Problem Drinker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Carter Sobell
    • 1
  • Mark B. Sobell
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Psychological StudiesNova Southeastern UniversityFort LauderdaleUSA

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