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An Ecological Metaphor for Researching Technology Use and Pedagogical Innovations

  • Nancy Law
  • Allan Yuen
  • Robert Fox
Chapter

Abstract

Education is organic: it involves actions of individuals, interacting with one another within different contexts and environments in homes, in urban centres and rural settings, in classrooms, schools, regions, countries, and the world. Ecology is a study of interactions between organisms and interactions of organisms with their environments. In this book, we use the ecological metaphor as a conceptual and practical framework for broad-based research in education. The advantage of this metaphor is its interdisciplinary nature and its all encompassing ability to view multiple interrelated components of entire environments and how these impact on and affect one another and the entire system. We argue that the study of technology use and pedagogical innovations in education systems demands such an approach. The main purpose of this book is to explore where and how information and communication technology (ICT) has made significant educational impact on the goals, outcomes, and processes of education in different countries, and where this impact is clearly evident. Another purpose is to examine the strategies and policies at the school and system levels that appear to be the most effective in bringing about desired learning outcomes and processes.

Keywords

Pedagogical Practice Educational Change Grey Squirrel Innovative Practice Pedagogical Innovation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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