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Designing a CSCL environment for experimental learning in a distance learning context

  • M. Felisa Verdejo
  • Beatriz Barros
  • Timothy Read
  • Miguel Rodriguez-Artacho
Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning book series (CULS, volume 9)

Abstract: This paper deals with the design of collaborative support for experimental learning, focusing on the articulation of actions in the lab, either real or virtual, and argumentation. Our approach is based upon a distance learning context where we distinguish between three phases: pre-lab, lab and post-lab. We elaborate on the pre-lab phase. The goal of this phase is to provide students with motivation and context for the lab phase, in order to situate theory and experimentation. We provide an environment where individual and remote collaborative activities are combined. Activities are structured to focus student attention on the issues they should learn about: content-related and problemsolving techniques as well as interpersonal skills. We propose to characterize the collaborative support in terms of the type of learning tasks in order to help designers define the kinds of mediational tools best suited for an experimental learning activity.

Keywords

Collaborative Learning Computer Support Task Space Argumentative Discussion Computer Support Collaborative Learn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Felisa Verdejo
    • 1
  • Beatriz Barros
    • 1
  • Timothy Read
    • 1
  • Miguel Rodriguez-Artacho
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informáticos UNEDCiudad Universitaria s/nMadridSpain

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