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A Paiva, R. Prada Supporting collaborative activities in computer-integrated classrooms - the NIMIS Approach

  • H. Ulrich Hoppe
  • Andreas Lingnau
  • Frank Tewissen
  • Ana Paiva
  • Rui Prada
  • Isabel Machado
Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning book series (CULS, volume 9)

Abstract: This chapter presents the concept of a collaborative computer integrated classroom (CiC) specially designed to achieve a unique combination of interactive and collaborative software with spatial arrangements, special furniture, and new peripherals including furniture (“roomware”). Although, technologically innovative, the CiC approach respects grown pedagogical traditions and classroom procedures. In-line with the notion of ubiquitous computing it tries to augment the real classroom instead of defining a virtual learning environment. Based on these principles, the European NIMIS project has put into practice a specific classroom environment for early learning with general tools and specific applications supporting literacy-related activities. In addition to the collaborative nature of the classroom scenario as such, specific mechanisms for co-construction in shared workspaces are provided.

Keywords

Ubiquitous Computing Collaborative Activity Virtual Learning Environment Story Creation Collaborative Session 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Ulrich Hoppe
    • 1
  • Andreas Lingnau
    • 1
  • Frank Tewissen
    • 1
  • Ana Paiva
    • 2
  • Rui Prada
    • 2
  • Isabel Machado
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Duisburg-EssenDuisburg-EssenGermany
  2. 2.ISCTEUniversity of Leeds & INESC-IDLisbonPortugal

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