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Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Surgical Perspective

  • Robert L. Dodd
  • Gary K. Steinberg

Abstract

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are rare vascular lesions [1], [2]; however, because hemorrhage of CCMs can result in significant morbidity and mortality [3], [4], a great deal of effort has been devoted to their detection and treatment. Although previously thought to be solely congenital, it is now well recognized that many cavernous malformations are acquired [5], arising de novo or occasionally after radiotherapy. The natural history of cavernous malformations is only now being elucidated with the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary reports suggest the annual risk of clinically significant hemorrhage to be less than 1% [1]–[4], although many factors may increaHse this risk. In general, the results of surgical removal of accessible symptomatic cavernomas are excellent, with improved control of medically intractable seizures, restoration of neurologic function, and decreased risk of future hemorrhage. Surgically inaccessible lesions remain a difficult clinical challenge.

Keywords

Vascular Malformation Cavernous Malformation Cavernous Angioma Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Microsurgical Resection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Dodd
    • 1
  • Gary K. Steinberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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