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Running on Empty, Running on Full: Summary and Synthesis

Part of the Advancing Responsible Adolescent Development book series (ARAD)

Abstract

A book review by Henry (2006) of Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled—And More Miserable Than Ever Before, depicts this generation as “the most wanted generation in history” (given advances in birth control) and the most pampered. As Henry (2006) points out, they have learned their lessons well:

Feeling good about yourself is the most important thing in life .... Self-love is not so much a goal as a birthright .... Old-fashioned values like hard work and skill have been cast aside in favor of giving everyone a gold star—because they’re good enough, smart enough, and doggone it, people like them! (p. 32)

Keywords

Young Adult Young Adulthood Environmental Context American Psychological Association Career Path 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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