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John Hunter's Contributions to Neuroscience

  • James L. Stone
  • James T. Goodrich
  • George R. Cybulski
Chapter

John Hunter was a giant in the natural sciences and medicine (Fig. 1). His overall contributions to the basic and clinical neurosciences were substantial but are little known. One reason is because as a “naturalist” Hunter’s underlying emphasis was upon the greater understanding of life itself, including paleontology and geology. His main interests were in the philosophy of life and nature, and he was one of the few in England at that time who took a really comprehensive view of these phenomena. Essentially a novel thinker rather than a studious scholar, he extensively utilized both inductive and deductive methods.

Keywords

Hydatid Cyst Trigeminal Neuralgia Brain Abscess Olfactory Nerve Comparative Anatomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. Stone
    • 1
  • James T. Goodrich
    • 2
  • George R. Cybulski
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Neurosurgery and NeurologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric Neurological SurgeryMontefiore Children's Hospital, and Albert Einstein College of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryNorthwestern University and Division of NeurosurgeryChicagoUSA

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