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John Wesley on the Estimation and Cure of Nervous Disorders

  • James G. Donat
Chapter

The Reverend John Wesley (1703–1791) is historically remembered as the founder of the Methodist Church. Largely forgotten is his long-standing involvement in medical matters, as an advisor of healthy regimens and collector of helpful remedies. Still active at 79 years of age he publishes the anonymous pamphlet, An Estimate of the Manners of the Present Times (1782), and at 81 he writes “Thoughts on Nervous Disorders” (1784), sending it to press in the Arminian Magazine for January–February 1786. In both of these compositions, the aged Wesley is aware of the growing problem of nervous complaints in English society, with an eye to its effect on Methodist people, who are part of that society: An Estimate especially focuses on the numbers; and “Thoughts” on the cause and treatment of said disorders.

Keywords

Nervous Disorder Journal Entry Nervous Disease Intermit Fever Animal Spirit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • James G. Donat
    • 1
  1. 1.ChicagoUSA

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