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Individuals in Movements

A Social Psychology of Contention
  • Jacquelien van Stekelenburg
  • Bert Klandermans
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Social psychology is interested in how social context influences individuals’ behavior. The prototypical social psychological question related to collective action is that of why some individuals participate in social movements while others do not, or for that matter, why some individuals decide to quit while others stay involved. The social psychological answer to these questions is given in terms of typical psychological processes such as identity, cognition, motivation, and emotion. People—social psychologists never tire of asserting—live in a perceived world. They respond to the world as they perceive and interpret it, and if we want to understand their cognitions, motivations, and emotions we need to know their perceptions and interpretations. Hence, social psychology focuses on subjective variables and takes the individual as its unit of analysis.

Keywords

Collective Action Social Movement Social Identity Relative Deprivation Collective Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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SUGGESTED READINGS

  1. We start the suggested readings section with a few preceding books on the social psychology of protest, starting with a classic followed by more contemporary books.Google Scholar
  2. Toch, H. 1965 The Social Psychology of Social Movements . Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill.Google Scholar
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  4. Klandermans, B. 1997 The Social Psychology of Protest . Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Identity appears to play a key role in social movement participation and the following books are excellent sources to get a grip on how social psychologists study and interpret the concept identity more in general and in the context of collective action.Google Scholar
  6. Ellemers, N., R. Spears, and B. Doosje. 1999 Social Identity: Context, Commitment, and Content . Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  7. Simon, B. 2004 Identity in Modern Society. A Social Psychological Perspective . Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  8. Stryker, S., T. J. Owens, and R. W. White. 2000 Self, Identity, and Social Movements . Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  9. It is hard to conceive of social movement participation without feelings of injustice; the following reference give an outstanding review of the social−psychological literature on justice and social movements.Google Scholar
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  11. We argued that in collective action research emotions are a novice with a long history. We consider socially structured emotions a new and inviting field in relation to collective action, which is a social phenomenon by nature. Therefore we suggest two key readings in this field:Google Scholar
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  15. Sears, D., L. Huddy, and R. Jervis. 2003 Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology . New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Snow, D. A., S. A. Soule, and H. Kriesi. 2004 The Blackwell Companion to Social Movements Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacquelien van Stekelenburg
    • 1
  • Bert Klandermans
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Faculty of Social SciencesVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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