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Assessing the Politics of Protest Political Science and the Study of Social Movements

  • David S. Meyer
  • Lindsey Lupo
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Social movements represent a challenge not only to more conventional political action, but also to academic analysis. To be sure, scholarly inquiry often does not neatly follow disciplinary boundaries. Topics, ideas, methods, and even scholars borrow move across disciplinary boundaries. Such disciplinary spillover figures to be even more pronounced in an area of inquiry like social movements, where the definitional boundaries are not well delineated and the questions to be explored are extremely diverse. As a discipline, political science touches on many aspects of social movements and the politics of protest

Keywords

Political Science Social Movement American Political Science Review Comparative Politics Political Opportunity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David S. Meyer
    • 1
  • Lindsey Lupo
    • 2
  1. 1.University of California IrvineIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of California IrvineIrvineUSA

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