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Structural Approaches in the Sociology of Social Movements

  • Jackie Smith
  • Tina Fetner
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Sociological research emphasizes how social institutions, such as the family, religion, corporations, and governments, influence people’s choices about how they live. While acknowledging that individuals have some freedom to pursue different paths, sociologists argue that this freedom is limited in important ways by forces outside the control of individuals. Sociology, therefore, asks how these broader forces operate to affect the actions and beliefs of individuals and groups. As the editors have noted, sociological research on social movements can be classified as adopting either a structural or cultural emphasis. While the former focuses on the distribution of material resources and the organizations and institutions that govern such distribution, the latter approach emphasizes questions about how individuals and groups perceive and interpret these material conditions.

Keywords

Civil Society Social Movement Political Context American Sociological Review Political Opportunity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jackie Smith
    • 1
  • Tina Fetner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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