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The Struggle of Indigenous Americans: A Socio-Historical View

  • James V. Fenelon
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Indigenous People Native Nation Racial Hierarchy Pine Ridge Tribal Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • James V. Fenelon

There are no affiliations available

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