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Race and Ethnicity in the Labor Market; Employer Practices and Worker Strategies

  • Roberta Spalter-Roth
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Labor Market Affirmative Action Race Relation Russell Sage Foundation Soft Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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