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Race, Ethnicity, and Health: An Intersectional Approach

  • Lynn Weber
  • M. Elizabeth Fore
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Black Woman Health Disparity Ethnic Disparity Address Health Disparity Intersectional Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Lynn Weber
  • M. Elizabeth Fore

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