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Identifying Causal Ecologic Effects on Health: A Methodological Assessment

  • S. V. Subramanian
  • M. Maria Glymour
  • Ichiro Kawachi

Keywords

Propensity Score Instrumental Variable Causal Effect Ecologic Effect Neighborhood Characteristic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. V. Subramanian
  • M. Maria Glymour
  • Ichiro Kawachi

There are no affiliations available

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