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Stitching Women’s Lives: Interpreting the Artifacts of Sewing and Needlework

  • Mary C. Beaudry
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

In our introduction to this book, James Symonds and I characterized interpretive historical archaeology as a multifaceted congeries of contextual, politically and socially engaged approaches to the study of human lives and experiences. American historical archaeologists have employed variants of interpretive archaeology in their work since, at the very least, the 1970s (see, e.g., Ascher and Fairbanks, 1971; Deetz, 1977; Leone, 1977), although, apart from the noteworthy exceptions by Ascher and Fairbanks, Deetz, and Leone cited above, interpretive historical archaeologies failed to gain prominence in the field until after postprocessual archaeology (Hodder, 1991) and postcolonial theory (Trigger, 2005:444–478; Wilkie, 2009:337) gained firm traction as alternatives to the long-entrenched canon of processualism (Beaudry, 1996, 2007).

Keywords

Gender Identity Material Culture Social Rank Historical Archaeology Postcolonial Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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