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“Sorting Stones”: Monuments, Memory and Resistance in the Scottish Highlands

  • Siân Jones
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

These enigmatic yet forceful statements are taken from an interview carried out in 2001 with two men in their mid 40’s and 30’s respectively. Both live in Hilton of Cadboll, a small village on the seaboard of Easter Ross in north-east Scotland. This was my first interview in Hilton and I was nervous about how effective I would be. Rightly so, it turned out. My main aim was to explore the meanings and values attached to the celebrated Hilton of Cadboll cross-slab.

Keywords

Lower Section National Museum Oral History Early Nineteenth Century Social Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to many people and organisations without which this chapter would not have been possible. The Hilton of Cadboll research was generously supported by grants from Historic Scotland, the University of Manchester and the Arts and Humanities Research Leave scheme. Thanks to Sally Foster for introducing me to the fascinating biography of the Hilton of Cadboll cross-slab and for her unflagging support. Thanks also to individuals in the following organisations for their important contributions: Groam House Museum, GUARD, Historic Scotland, The Highland Council, National Museums of Scotland, RACE, Seaboard 2000, Tain Museum, Tarbat Discovery Centre. In writing this chapter, I have benefited greatly from comments and suggestions from Eleanor Casella, Stuart Jeffrey, Colin Richards and Tom Yarrow. Thanks also to the editors, Mary Beaudry and Jim Symonds for their patience and hard work. Finally, thanks to Dolly Macdonald, and the other residents of Hilton and the seaboard area of Easter Ross, for their insight and candid reflections. They tolerated my intrusion in their lives with patience, good humour and generosity.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of ManchesterManchesterUK

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