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Chimpanzee Conservation and Theatre: A Case Study of an Awareness Project Around the Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire

  • Christophe Boesch
  • Claude Gnakouri
  • Luis Marques
  • Grégoire Nohon
  • Ilka Herbinger
  • Francis Lauginie
  • Hedwige Boesch
  • Séverin Kouamé
  • Moustapha Traoré
  • Francis Akindes
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Introduction

Do educational activities designed to increase awareness of wildlife and conservation issues actually lead to behavioral changes that promote conservation and protect wild populations? For the most part, this question remains unanswered for a variety of reasons. Evaluations of educational programs are often not conducted and, when they are, results addressing behavioral change are rarely included or are unclear. For example, the relationship between changes in knowledge and attitudes that often accompanies educational programs and changes in conservation-related behavior is not well understood (Stoinski et al., 2001). Additionally, in many field situations, conservation activities are often multifaceted, and thus it is difficult to quantify the effectiveness of individual components on changes in human practices (Oates, 1999). Specifically, gaining information on the effectiveness of educational activities aimed to influence the local population is important, as local...

Keywords

Local People Audience Member Colobus Monkey Chimpanzee Population Secondary School Pupil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the Ivorian authorities for supporting the projects of the Wild Chimpanzees Foundation from the beginning, especially the “Ministère de l'Environnement,” the “Direction de la protection de la Nature,” the PACNPT (Projet Autonome pour la Conservation du Parc National de Taï), and the WWF We like to thank the following people for support: Camille Troh Dji, Touré Zoumana, Honora Néné Kpzahi, and Paul Zouhou. Particular thanks go to Daniel Pauselius for his skill in filming the performances. We thank the following organization for logistic and financial support of this project: Swiss Center for Scientific Research (CSRS) in Côte d'Ivoire, Worldwide Wildlife Fund-Germany, Leipzig Zoo, Tierschutz Zürich, USFW-Great Apes Conservation Fund, and UNEP-Great Ape Survival Project.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christophe Boesch
    • 1
    • 2
  • Claude Gnakouri
    • 3
  • Luis Marques
    • 3
  • Grégoire Nohon
    • 1
  • Ilka Herbinger
    • 1
    • 4
  • Francis Lauginie
    • 1
  • Hedwige Boesch
    • 1
  • Séverin Kouamé
    • 5
  • Moustapha Traoré
    • 5
  • Francis Akindes
    • 5
  1. 1.Wild Chimpanzee FoundationGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary AnthropologyLeipzigGermany
  3. 3.Ymako TeatriAbidjanCôte d'Ivoire
  4. 4.Centre Suisse de Recherches ScientifiquesAbidjanCôte d'Ivoire
  5. 5.Laboratoire d'Économie et de Sociologie RuraleUniversité de BouakéBouakéCôte d'Ivoire

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