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Sanctuaries and Reintroduction: A Role in Gorilla Conservation?

  • Kay H. Farmer
  • Amos Courage
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Introduction

The current threats to gorilla (Gorilla gorilla, Gorilla beringei) populations, and indeed African wildlife in general, are complex and inextricably interlinked, and include poverty, human population growth, loss of habitat (through logging, mining, and land conversion), and hunting (Butynski, 2001; Teleki, 2001; Nellemann and Newton, 2002). Overexploitation of wildlife is not a new phenomenon and was probably responsible for the historical and ecological extinction of many species (Rao and McGowan, 2002). However, increasing urbanization and associated market economies, modern hunting methods and road networks, have commercialized the bushmeat trade (Kemf and Wilson, 1997; Bowen-Jones, 1998; Robinson and Bodmer, 1999; Wilkie and Carpenter, 1999; Fa et al., 2002; Nellemann and Newton, 2002). The general consensus seems to be that this trade is out of control, unsustainable, and accelerating (Ammann and Pearce, 1995; Kemf and Wilson, 1997; Butynski, 2001), and that...

Keywords

Release Site Captive Breeding Mountain Gorilla Captive Breeding Program Western Lowland Gorilla 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Dan Bucknell, Tony Chasar, David Lucas, Felix Lankester, and Ateh Wilson of the LWC; Neil Maddison of Bristol Zoo Gardens/CWAF; and Liz Pearson and Tony King of PPG, for their invaluable contributions to this chapter. We also thank Hannah Buchanan-Smith, James Anderson, Liz Williamson, Anita Rennie, and an anonymous reviewer for commenting on the manuscript. Finally, thanks to Tara Stoinski for inviting this hotly debated topic alongside more traditional approaches to conservation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kay H. Farmer
    • 1
  • Amos Courage
    • 2
  1. 1.Scottish Primate Research Group Department of PsychologyUniversity of Stirling StirlingScotlandUK
  2. 2.John Aspinall Foundation Port LympneKentEngland

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