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Linking the Community Options Analysis and Investment Toolkit (COAIT), Consensys® and Payment for Environmental Services (PES): A Model to Promote Sustainability in African Gorilla Conservation

  • Michael Brown
  • Jean Martial Bonis-Charancle
  • Zephyrin Mogba
  • Rachna Sundararajan
  • Rees Warne
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Most approaches to gorilla conservation have been top-down national park approaches that have included some limited form of community participation. 1 The top-down approaches have worked relatively well in Uganda and Rwanda; as Adams and Infield (2001, p. 146) put it, “the patient is stabilized, but the harder tasks of surgery and post-operative recovery lie ahead, but they do not appear to have guaranteed sustainability.” Eves and Bakarr (2001, p. 53) note meanwhile that “the maintenance of protected areas is an extremely costly and difficult process, and, despite tremendous concern and long-term efforts, most governments are hard-pressed to secure the human and financial resources necessary to monitor, manage and protect wildlife populations.” Given the economic, social, political, and population pressures many communities face, frontline communities' neighboring parks could represent a serious medium- to long-term threat to gorilla conservation in the absence of innovative...

Keywords

Conflict Management Central African Republic Global Environment Facility Participatory Rural Appraisal National Park Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Brian Greenberg and Christin Hutchinson, formerly of IRM, for their review and technical inputs.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Brown
    • 1
  • Jean Martial Bonis-Charancle
    • 1
  • Zephyrin Mogba
    • 1
  • Rachna Sundararajan
    • 1
  • Rees Warne
    • 1
  1. 1.Innovative Resources Management WashingtonUSA

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