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Pulmonary Disease and Lung Transplantation

  • Donna K. Broshek
  • George W. Shaver
  • Mark D. Robbins
Chapter

Patients and physicians alike are often surprised to learn that neuropsychologists play a role in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary disease. Given that the brain requires 20% of the body’s oxygen supply despite weighing only 2% of total body mass and that the primary function of the lungs is to provide a place for oxygen from the air to enter the bloodstream, it seems quite logical that pulmonary and cerebral functioning are closely linked (Brigham and Women’s Hospital Neurosurgery Group, 2006). In addition, since neurons have no oxygen storage, they are exquisitely sensitive to hypoxic states that can arise due to pulmonary disease. As a result, neuropsychology can provide valuable information in the clinical and empirical understanding of patients with compromised pulmonary functioning. This chapter will describe various types of chronic and end-stage pulmonary disease, associated neurocognitive deficits, and lung transplant evaluations.

Overview of Pulmonary Disease

Types of...

Keywords

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Single Photon Emission Compute Tomography Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patient Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Lung Transplant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donna K. Broshek
    • 1
  • George W. Shaver
    • 1
  • Mark D. Robbins
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurocognitive Assessment Laboratory, Box 800203University of Virginia Health SystemCharlottesvilleUSA

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