Oncogene Addiction: Mouse Models and Clinical Relevance for Molecularly Targeted Therapies

  • James V. Alvarez
  • Elizabeth S. Yeh
  • Yi Feng
  • Lewis A. Chodosh


Cancer results from the dysregulation of pathways controlling the growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival of tumor cells, as well as fundamental alterations in the manner in which cells interact with their microenvironment (Hanahan and Weinberg 2000). Several lines of evidence suggest that these alterations are due to the accumulation of multiple mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that disrupt their normal function or regulation. These mutations provide a selective advantage to the cells in which they occur, leading to their expansion and clinical manifestation as a tumor.


Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cancer Stem Cell Tumor Regression Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • James V. Alvarez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elizabeth S. Yeh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yi Feng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lewis A. Chodosh
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Cancer BiologyRaymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Abramson Family Cancer Research InstituteRaymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Cell and Developmental BiologyRaymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Department of MedicineRaymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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