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Utilizing Mouse Models of Human Cancer for Assessing Immune Modulation of Cancer Development

  • Karin E. de Visser
  • Lisa M. Coussens
Chapter

Abstract

The availability and diversity of mouse models of human cancer that develop organ-specific neoplasms has increased significantly in the past 10 years. These, coupled with mouse strains where components of the immune system have been manipulated or deleted, have provided novel insights into how immune cells and immune function significantly contributes to cancer development. Herein, we review relevant literature, where mouse models of human cancer development have provided novel insights into mechanisms of pro- versus antitumor immunity.

Keywords

Adaptive Immunity Adaptive Immune System Antitumor Immunity Innate Immune Cell Immune Cell Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank all those that have contributed to work discussed here but are not referenced due to space constraints. The authors acknowledge support by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/NCI (R01CA130980, R01CA132566, R01CA140943, P50CA58207), and the Department of Defense (W81XWH-06-1-0416, PR080717 to L.M.C., and grants from the Dutch Cancer Society (2006-3715 and 2011-5004), the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (VIDI 917.96.307), and the Association for International Cancer Research (AICR 11-0677) to K.E.d.V.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular BiologyThe Netherlands Cancer InstituteAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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