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Are We Lost in Translations?: Unanswered Questions on Trauma, Culture and Posttraumatic Syndromes and Recommendations for Future Research

  • John P. Wilson
  • Boris Drožđek

Keywords

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Experience Psychological Trauma Trauma Complex Trauma Survivor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. Wilson
  • Boris Drožđek

There are no affiliations available

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