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Lost in Limbo: Cultural Dimensions in Psychotherapy and Supervision with Temporary Protection Visa Holder from Afghanistan

  • Robin Bowles
  • Nooria Mehraby

Keywords

Terrorist Attack Asylum Seeker Permanent Residence Trauma Survivor Refugee Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Bowles
  • Nooria Mehraby

There are no affiliations available

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