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Pancreatic Cancer Genomics, Epigenomics, and Proteomics

  • Michael Goggins
Part of the M. D. Anderson Solid Tumor Oncology Series book series (MDA)

Extensive genetic and epigenetic alterations accumulate during the development and evolution of pancreatic cancer. In turn these alterations give rise to additional proteomics changes within the neoplasm, extensive changes in adjacent tumor stroma, and secondary effects in other biological compartments such as the circulation. This chapter describes the spectrum of genetic, epigenetic, RNA, and proteomic alterations observed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas as well as their biological and clinical utility.

Keywords

Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Cell Pancreatic Juice Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Goggins
    • 1
  1. 1.The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and the John Hopkins Medical InstitutionsBaltimoreUSA

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