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Boot Camps

  • David B. Wilson
  • Doris Layton MacKenzie

Discipline is one of the first words that come to mind when one hears the phrase “boot camps.” Boot camps have a long history within the United States military (officially called basic training) and have been used to indoctrinate recruits into the culture of the military. The military boot camp is replete with strict discipline, grueling physical activity, and instruction in the basics of military life. Boot camps have been romanticized as an environment that changes boys into men and many men who served in the military reflect nostalgically on their boot camp experience (Simon, 1995).

Keywords

Recidivism Rate Boot Camp Comparison Participant Delinquency Prevention Strict Discipline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • David B. Wilson
  • Doris Layton MacKenzie

There are no affiliations available

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