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Child Social Skills Training

  • Friedrich Lösel
  • Andreas Beelmann

Early developmental prevention of aggressive, delinquent, and other forms of antisocial behavior has become a very important field of research and policymaking in many countries (Farrington and Coid, 2003; Loeber and Farrington, 1998, 2001; McCord and Tremblay, 1992; Peters and McMahon, 1996).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Skill Training Crime Prevention Social Skill Training Clinical Child Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Friedrich Lösel
  • Andreas Beelmann

There are no affiliations available

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