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Early Parent Training

  • Odette Bernazzani
  • Richard E. Tremblay

Disruptive behavior in children can be defined as an array of behavior problems that include opposition to adults, hyperactivity, stealing, lying, truancy, extreme non-compliance, aggression, physical cruelty to people and animals, and destructive and sexually coercive behaviors (American Psychiatric Association, 1994; Quay and Hogan, 1999a).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Disruptive Behavior Physical Aggression Parent Training Conduct Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Odette Bernazzani
  • Richard E. Tremblay

There are no affiliations available

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